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Program of Studies

At Waltham High School, we are proud of our academic programs.  We provide courses to meet every student’s needs: challenging standards-based courses for all students, advanced placement courses for higher achieving students, and technical certification courses for multiple vocational and technology pathways.  Our fine and performing arts, vocational, and athletic programs are an integral part of Waltham High School that augment our academic program of studies. We are educating the citizens of tomorrow.

    Graduation Requirements

  • 4 years of English
  • 4 years of Math
  • 3 years of History - World History, United States History I & II
  • 4 years of Physical Education and Wellness
  • 3 years of Lab Sciences
  • 10 credits in Arts Electives*
  • 2 years of a single World Language
  • Every student must have a schedule that has 30 class periods per week and accrue minimum of 120 credits by graduation.
  • * See Arts Electives for more information.

    MASSCORE

The Massachusetts High School Program of Studies (MassCore) is intended to help students be college and career ready by taking a rigorous course of study. Students will arrive at college or the workplace well-prepared and the number of students taking remedial courses in college will be reduced. MassCore recommends a comprehensive set of subject area courses and units to be completed before graduating high school.

The recommended program of studies includes: four years of English, four years of math (to include Algebra II), three years of lab-based science, three years of history, two years of the same foreign language, one year of an arts program, and five additional “core” courses such as business, health, and/or technology. MassCore recommendations are aligned with Massachusetts University admission requirements beginning with the Class of 2017.

    Special Education

The Waltham Public Schools Special Education Department offers a wide variety of programs for special needs students. The goal of the Special Education Department is to enable students to access the general education curriculum. For all students deemed eligible, and on an Individual Education Program (I.E.P.), instruction is individualized taking into consideration each child’s unique learning style. Programming is developed which allows the student to work to their potential in the least restrictive environment. Selection of the appropriate programs is done through the TEAM process and is based on individual needs as developed in the educational plan. Students who receive special education services work closely with their liaisons to ensure that their individual education program complies with standards based instruction and the curriculum frameworks.
 

Course Offerings

    Career and Technical Education

Director: Lauren DeLeon

The Career & Technical Education Department encompasses four different program areas including Ch.74 Vocational Technical Programs, Business, Family Consumer Science and Technology Education. Students participating in CTE programming are able to learn in a practical, hands on environment while earning credit towards their 'Arts' graduation requirement. Students who participate in a Ch.74 Vocational Technical Program may qualify for a certificate upon graduation which can lead them directly into the workforce, or earn them college credit through one of our many articulation agreements.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    Business

The Business Department offers a variety of courses for grades 9-12. All business courses meet the Waltham High School Art requirement as well as the MassCore requirement for graduation. Each course provides students with real and relevant skills including; critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving, team building, entrepreneurial, organizational and mechanical reasoning skills using a hands-on Project Based Learning Model. Students will gain valuable insight to the Business Industry in courses like Introduction to Business, Sports and Entertainment Marketing, Retail Management, Financial Literacy, Finance and Investments, Entrepreneurship, and the School to Career Program.

    INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS CONCEPTS

This course provides opportunities to learn about and experience a wide variety of topics in the field of business, including the economy, business types, marketing, e-commerce, sales process, and business management and leadership. Students will also learn about personal financial planning, real estate, college aid, resume building, career options and retirement planning. The course will be heavily focused on real-world application of the material and incorporates projects where students can apply the content in the real business world. (2.5 Credits)

    SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING

The sports and entertainment industry is a multi-billion dollar industry that has some effect on every consumer, regardless of their age. Thus, sports and entertainment marketing is a growing division of the marketing field with a tremendous impact on the economy and with many career opportunities. This class will provide students with an overview of the sports and entertainment field from a business perspective. Students will explore the world of marketing through the sports and entertainment industry. This course includes business, management, and entrepreneurship; communication and interpersonal skills; economics; and professional development foundations. Emphasis is placed upon the functions of marketing-information management, pricing, product/service management, promotion, and selling. Students will spend a large part of this course with hands-on, student-developed activities to meet course goals. Special projects within the school and community will be added to ensure real-world experience. (5 Credits)

    RETAIL MANAGEMENT

Retail Management is a course that will prepare students to operate businesses that sell, rent, or lease goods and services. This course will provide insight into the theory behind buying, storing, pricing, advertising, display, selling, financing, and other activities necessary for successful retail business operations. Hands-on application will come in the form of the operation of a new venture: The Waltham High School Store, both on the floor and behind-the-scenes. The Waltham High School Store operation will involve: retail, marketing, accounting/bookkeeping, customer service, merchandising/inventorying, and more. 21st century skills and project-based learning will be stressed (communication, high standards of personal behavior, critical thinking, the use of technology, and working cooperatively). (5 Credits)

    FINANCE AND INVESTMENTS

This course is designed to examine aspects of finance and investments. You will learn how to manage your money, how to provide financial security for oneself, and how to make the best investments for financial independence. Insurance, mutual funds, 401K plans, tax sheltered annuities, and the stock markets are some of the units studied. Highly motivated students who plan to pursue a college major in business will benefit greatly. We welcome students who wish to use this course for financial improvement. (5 Credits)

    FINANCIAL LITERACY

This personal financial literacy course is designed to alert, inform, and educate students in concepts of personal finance and money management. Students will begin to develop the skills and strategies that promote personal and financial responsibility related to financial planning, savings, investment, and effective money management. Topics covered in this course will include: college and career planning, money management, savings and investing, income, and spending. The course will teach students to search and assess college and career opportunities, identify and prioritize their personal money management goals, develop personal spending and savings plans, comprehend the impact of time on the value of money, understand the cost of using credit, and protect assets. (2.5 Credits)

    ENTREPRENEURSHIP: BUILDING LEADERSHIP FOR FUTURE CAREERS IN BUSINESS

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This course concentrates on starting and growing new businesses. During this course, students will investigate the concepts, tools, and practices of entrepreneurship. This course will concentrate on: identifying new venture opportunities (versus ideas), evaluating the viability of a new venture, writing a business plan, understanding which skills are necessary for success, how to market the business and selecting a type of business ownership, and learning about the financial management strategies of being an entrepreneur. At the end of this course, students will be able to write, and present a business plan that will be ready for investor review, and possess a better understanding of their personal entrepreneurial capacity. Additionally, the course will have a strong focus on leadership skills essential in all future business career choices. (2.5 Credits)

    SCHOOL TO CAREER PROGRAM

This work based learning program is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate aptitudes that cannot be evaluated in a regular classroom setting. Students will be required to work a minimum of 20 hours per week, or more depending on their school schedule. These work hours should take place both during the week and the weekends. The students’ workplace or community service venue is considered a classroom and the employer’s evaluation of the student as well as the submission of monthly timesheets or proof of employment documentation, and daily sign out logs earn the student credit towards graduation. Prior to admission into this program, students must complete an application signed by their parent/guardian, housemaster and guidance counselor, and meet with the School to Career Coordinator. The School to Career Coordinator will verify employment prior to the student being allowed to participate. Students interested in this program MUST meet with the School to Career Coordinator for rules and approval prior to acceptance into the program. (5 Credits)

    Family Consumer Science

The Family and Consumer program offers a variety of courses for grades 9-12. All family and consumer courses meet the Waltham High School Arts requirement as well as the MassCore requirement for graduation. Each course provides students with real and relevant skills including; critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving, team building, entrepreneurial, organizational and mechanical reasoning skills using a hands-on Project Based Learning Model. Students will gain valuable insight to the following industries; Early Education Child Care, Fashion Design, Health and Nutrition, Baking and Culinary.

    BAKE SHOP

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of baking and the dessert presentation. Preparation and baking of dough, quick breads, cookies, tarts, pies, cakes and pastry items will be covered. Students will learn baking terminology, weighing, measuring, the functions and proper use of ingredients, the use tools and equipment, and presentation of the product. This course gives valuable insight to the Baking Industry that will provide guidance into Career and College pathways. (2.5 Credits)

    CHEFS

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of basic meal planning and food preparation. Students will use a wide variety of cooking and food preparation techniques, focusing on the skills necessary to live on your own. Units will include, breakfast; lunch; breads and desserts. Culture and its impact on food will be explored. (2.5 Credits)

    FOODS

This course includes the continuation of fundamentals of cooking and baking principles achieved in Chefs or Bake Shop. Topics will include advanced food preparation, Food safety, personal sanitation, and guided nutritional practices . Skills learned in this class will provide guidance into College and Career pathways. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chefs or Bake Shop. (5 Credits)

    CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

This course will introduce students to early education child care and the relationships of families. The developmental stages, interaction and supervision of children, health and safety practices, appropriate activities and positive interactions with children, family engagement and appropriate care of children are the foundations of this course. Students will gain valuable insight to the Child Care Industry that will provide guidance into Career and College pathways. (2.5 Credits)

    INTRODUCTION TO FASHION DESIGN

This course provides the foundation for the future study in the field of Fashion Design. This course will introduce students to the mechanics of the sewing machine as well as basic hand sewing techniques. Redesigning, recycling and alterations of garments will allow students to work independently, master their skills and tap into their own creativity through design. (2.5 Credits)

    PINTEREST© CRAFT CLASS

Express your inner creativity through inspired projects from the popular site Pinterest©. Learn the latest trends and techniques to create jewelry pieces, hair accessories, paper crafting, holiday decor and much more. (2.5 Credits)

    FASHION DESIGN I

This course teaches basic sewing skills and the use of the sewing machine, while exploring fashion trends, color choices, and textile basics. Students are responsible for their own project materials. (5 Credits)

    FASHION DESIGN II

This advanced course presents design principles and wardrobe planning. More challenging fabrics and techniques are encouraged. Prerequisite: Fashion Design I Students are responsible for their own project materials. (5 Credits)

    FASHION DESIGN III

This course is designed for the student who plans to pursue a career in fashion design or the textile arts. Students will recognize and apply the principles and elements of design to create original designs. Prerequisite: Fashion Design II. Students are responsible for their own project materials. (5 Credits)

    Technology Education

The Technology Education program offers a variety of courses for grades 9-12. All technology courses meet the Waltham High School Arts requirement as well as the MassCore requirement for graduation. Each course provides students with real and relevant skills including; critical and creative thinking skills, problem solving, team building, entrepreneurial, organizational and mechanical reasoning skills using a hands-on Project Based Learning Model. Students will gain valuable insight to the Technology Industry in the fields of Health Assisting, Small Engines, Construction Techniques, Computer Aided Drafting and Design, Graphic Design, and Digital Illustration.

    INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH ASSISTING

Introduction to Health Assisting offers students an overview of healthcare professions and the various occupations available in the field. The goal is to have an introductory knowledge and pre-care skills necessary to continue in the Nurse Aide curriculum. Students are introduced to the language of medicine and medical terminology, and begin studying the basic structure of the human body. The Health Assisting curriculum also includes an introduction to nutrition & introduction to geriatrics and understanding dementia. The students are taught CPR, first aid, infection control and basic anatomy and physiology. (2.5 Credits)

    TECHNOLOGY FOR SCHOOL

This course introduces students to the uses and misuses of technology for school. Students will gain a basic knowledge of computers and systems to then develop skills to operate technology concepts and operations, create and communicate research information, and digital citizenship. Microsoft office, Google Apps, budgeting websites, resume and cover letter writing, and student portfolios are a few of the applications. This course gives valuable insight to the Technology Industry that will provide guidance into Career and College pathways. (2.5 Credits)

    COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING AND DESIGN

Drafters and designers are required for every manufacturing and construction process. This course will provide a basic understanding of the universal graphic language that all drafters use. Students will initially measure and sketch views from a collection of actual mechanical parts using paper and pencil, progressing quickly to the use of SolidWorks drafting software, and producing CAD drawings. The importance of drawing to scale and correct view location will be stressed. SolidWorks 3D Parametric Design Technology is the dominant CAD program used in industry today. (2.5 Credits)

    METAL FABRICATION TECHNOLOGY

This course will focus on the techniques of metal fabrication and welding. Introductory to ARC, MIG and oxyacetylene will be taught. Students will be trained to use the oxyacetylene torch for heating and cutting metal into projects. Other metal working tools such as the drill press, electric grinder, the band saw, ironworker, sheet metal sheer and hand –forged blacksmith techniques will provide students with the foundation and skill of the metal fabrication trade. (2.5 Credits)

    SMALL ENGINE SYSTEMS

This course will introduce students to the systems and the mechanics of small engines. Roll up your sleeves and join us to learn how small engines work, and how to service and repair them. This class examines the workings of 2-cycle and 4-cycle engines and the theory of operation. Fuel systems, basic electrical, maintenance and storage of power equipment are some of the topics covered. Students will gain valuable insight to the Auto Industry that will provide guidance into Career and College pathways. (2.5 Credits)

    BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals and interdisciplinary connections of carpentry and welding. Construction and manufacturing techniques, metal fabrication and welding techniques, drafting and using hand tools and machinery are the foundations of this course. Students will gain valuable insight to the Carpentry, Electrical and Metal Fabrication Industries that will provide guidance into Career and College pathways. (2.5 Credits)

    DIGITAL ILLUSTRATION

Since the dawning of the computer age, artists have explored new techniques and discovered the creative potential of the digital canvas. From illustrated books, comic books, graphic novels, editorial illustration and children’s books, digital illustration is quickly becoming the artist tool of choice for commercial artists around the world. In this class, students will learn the process of illustration to create digital art using Adobe Photoshop. (2.5 Credits)

    GRAPHIC DESIGN I

Graphic design is all around us. Part of a wide range of commercial arts, graphic design is a powerful visual communication practice that can transform how we interact with the world. Through websites, magazines, CD and book covers, logos, advertising, and social media, graphic designers shape messages using words and images to communicate a message. In this course, you will learn skills and techniques to creatively solve problems in a variety of real-world projects. Topics include: design principles; color theory; typography; image editing and retouching;; page layout; and graphic design career possibilities. (5 Credits)

    GRAPHIC DESIGN II

Graphic Design is everywhere! Expanding on the foundation created in Graphic Design One, students will continue their exploration of the commercial arts with advanced graphic design and illustration projects using Adobe software and traditional art tools. With an introduction to vector graphics, students will explore the wonder of Adobe Illustrator creating real-world projects including logo design, t-shirt design, package design, movie and book design. (5 Credits)

    ANIMATION AND MOTION GRAPHICS

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of both digital and traditional animation and motion graphics. Students will learn basic concepts, methods and techniques through hands-on experiences and projects directly related to professional experiences in the field of animation and motion graphics. Exploring stop-motion, hand drawn and digital animation, this class is geared toward individuals who wish to use and develop their creative expression skills, in conjunction with professional-level computer software techniques, to create design and illustration that moves!. Careers in commercial art and animation will be explored. Prerequisite: Digital Illustration or Graphic Design. (5 Credits)

    AP 2-D DESIGN STUDIO ART: ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN

The Advanced Placement 2-D Design Studio course is designed specifically for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the experience of creating college level 2-D Design and plans to pursue a career in the visual arts. Students will create a portfolio meeting the National expectations of the College Board Advanced Placement 2-D Studio Art Program. The required portfolio will serve as the AP Exam for the course and must be submitted to College Board for scoring. A superior work ethic both in and out of school will be required to prepare the 24-piece portfolio, which may include but is not limited to graphic design, illustration, digital imaging, photography, collage, painting, and printmaking. Throughout the portfolio, an emphasis will be made on three sections; Quality, Concentration, and Breadth. (5 Credits)

    PRINCIPLES OF TELEVISION AND MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION

Students who elect to enroll in this fun, and fast paced elective will enjoy exposure to state of the art television, computer and multimedia equipment. Through interesting and thought-provoking assignments, students will learn the basics of creating clear and concise multimedia presentations. They will deconstruct film, television and commercials in order to discover the role media plays in their social, economic and political lives. Assignments will range from television commercials to full-scale programming and will air on our own local access education channel WE-TV. Active participation is mandatory, as students should be prepared to perform daily, both in front of and behind the cameras. For classroom assignments students will record and videotape some programs after school and during weekends, as well as written homework and short papers. Upon completion of this course students will have developed the writing, vocabulary and production skills, essential to quality media productions. (2.5 Credits)

    SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT BROADCASTING

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

You watch the games. You know the players. You remember that signature call in that memorable game on television or that red carpet special at the Oscars and would love nothing more than to have a similar job in the industry. This course covers the nuts and bolts of the industry. We will also tackle the production requirements for pre-game/show preparation, play-by-play and color commentary, as well as in-game host, followed by post event coverage. Any aspiring sports broadcaster who hopes to succeed in this attractive career needs to understand the detailed ways in which the industry actually operates and functions. Opportunities will include: Guest speakers, field trips, working behind the scenes at sporting events at the high school/college level as well as producing a demo reel consisting of statements of work throughout the year. (2.5 Credits)

    Chapter 74 Career Vocational Technical Programs

Waltham High School offers Chapter 74 vocational programs to students in grades 9-12 including:

Automotive Technology; Collision Technology ; Carpentry; Culinary Arts; Early Education and Care; Electrical; Electronics; Graphic Communications; Health Assisting (in initial application stage); TV Broadcasting

*Metal Fabrication is a Ch.74 Program available to students in grades 10-12 only.

Students who participate in the 9th grade CVTE Exploratory Program will have the opportunity to continue his/her education in their chosen career field and follow a sequential path of courses for the next three years. By choosing a career pathway students have the unique opportunity to learn technical knowledge and skills, problem solving, and professional employability skills in a live shop using a hands on Project Based Learning (PBL) Model. Career Vocational Technical Education programming prepares students for their future goals, which can include college or pursuing a career right after high school. Students have access to rigorous academic courses, cultivating career skills in their chosen field, as well as potentially earning credit towards postsecondary programs while still in high school through our articulation agreements. In addition, CVTE students will have access to industry relevant certifications in their programs like OSHA-10 and ASE (Automotive Service Excellence). Each CVTE pathway follows state regulated curriculum frameworks and policy regulations. Maintaining CTE Chapter 74 approvals allows students to be able to earn their Competency of Occupational Proficiency (COP’s) certification in addition to their high school diploma. CTE pathways also provide internships and co-op opportunities for eligible junior and senior students who are in good standing academically as well as in their CVTE program.

    Grade 9 Exploratory Program

    CTE EXPLORATORY

Freshman who are interested in learning more about CTE programming are encouraged to participate in our Exploratory Program. This year long course will provide students with essential information about the Chapter 74 programs available at Waltham High School and related career pathways. Students will spend two weeks exploring each program before making a single course selection for the second half of the school year. During this exploration period, students will examine their interests, abilities and career pathway options while participating in mini projects that introduce them to the program. The exploratory program instructors will evaluate students during the first half of the school year using an established grading rubric in the following areas: Safety; Professionalism; Employability; Effort. (5 Credits)

    Automotive Technology

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Automotive Technology Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including vehicle safety inspections, tire service, hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will begin to learn vehicle and engine configurations, basic engine construction, engine systems, basic electrical/electronics, and diagnostic tools/techniques. Students will have the chance to disassemble, inspect and rebuild an engine. SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention certification will take place and a look at OSHA safety regulations/safety standards within the Auto Tech program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on ‘live’ cars including practice vehicles and actual customer’s cars. (5 Credits)

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Tech 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Automotive Technician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of automotive theory and diagnosis. Additionally students will study all aspects of brake, steering, and suspension systems and begin to interact with customers regarding the repairs to their vehicles Students will take part in SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention course, ASE student certification, Ford ACE certification and Valvoline ignition program certification. (15 Credits)

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Tech 2 course. Students will work on all aspects of engine performance including basic operation, mechanical problems, computer controls, electronic fuel injection, forced induction, and emission controls. Students will also learn about heating and air conditioning systems. Students will participate in SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention safety certification. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (17.5 Credits)

    Carpentry

    CARPENTRY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including an overview and use of shop equipment like the band saw, sander, and drill press, measuring/reading a tape measure, and hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at architectural drawings/blueprints, basic construction techniques like framing for ceilings/walls/floors, and basic cabinet making skills like joining. New equipment to be introduced is the table saw, cross cut saw, rip saw, dado and rabbet saws. Sample projects include a bench and chest. They will look to become proficient at safety standards. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Carpentry program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on real construction projects around the school building as available. (10 Credits)

    CARPENTRY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Carpenter or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of construction techniques including stair construction, drywall, plaster, tile, and roof construction. Students will be introduced to ‘green’ products like insulation, windows and doors. Activities will include building a coffee table, encompassing inlay techniques, learning more about types of wood and their properties, and learning new shop equipment like the router table. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    CARPENTRY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry 2 course. Students will work on developing skills in drawer construction including raised and flat panel with the construction of a nightstand. The course continues to focus on construction techniques and safety standards on the jobsite. A large focus is on entrepreneurial skills needed when running a business including withholdings, writing checks, balancing books, and job estimating. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. Prerequisite – A passing grade in Carpentry 2, and meeting attendance, discipline/conduct record, and safety requirements. (17.5 Credits)

    Collision Technology

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Automotive Collision Technology Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including vehicle safety inspections, detailing, identifying vehicle components, light cosmetic repairs, and hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at vehicle structures and identifying when to repair vs replace vehicle components. They will look to become proficient at preparing new and used panels, masking vehicles for paint, and final car detailing. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Auto Collision program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on ‘live’ cars including practice vehicles and actual customer’s cars. (5 Credits)

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Collision 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Automotive Collision Technician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of non-structural vehicle repairs. Activities will include dent repair, water leaks, glass removal/repair, welding technology, plastic repair, panel replacement/alignment and basic refinishing. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Collision 2 course. Students will work on developing skills in vehicle estimating, understanding vehicle insurance policies, basic structural analysis and repair, and advanced refinishing technology. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Culinary Arts

    CULINARY ARTS 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Culinary Arts Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including kitchen safety, proper food handling practices and sanitation, knife skills, beginning stages of food preparation as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at the strands of the culinary arts curriculum. In addition to menu planning, ordering, basic nutrition, and preparation of all food. Culinary students will gain experience in a student managed restaurant, and catering business. ServeSafe/ safety regulations and safety standards within the Culinary Arts program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    CULINARY ARTS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Culinary Arts 1 course. They will continue to expand their knowledge of kitchen safety, knife safety and begin exploring menu planning, nutrition, and complex multistage recipes. Students will have the opportunity to obtain their ServeSafe certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    CULINARY ARTS 3

This course building upon the skills learned in Culinary 1 & 2. It will focus on restaurant and catering production, menu planning, and the front of the house services aspects of the industry. (15 Credits)

    Early Education & Care

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE - CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including basic child development, classroom management techniques, and curriculum models, as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at how children develop from infancy through preschool. They will look to become proficient at understanding the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth of children. The Baby Think It Over dolls are an integral part of this program. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the EEC program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care - Child Development 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Preschool teacher or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of children, but the focus becomes how to teach preschool students. The class is broken down into three components: class work, learning activities, and field placements at local daycare centers. Course work is designed so students develop a complete understanding of the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional needs of children and their families. Activities will include a variety of hands on activities, lesson planning, cooking activities, and classroom maintenance. Students will be responsible for planning and implementing lessons with their classmates as well as visiting preschool students from a local center. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care 2 course. In addition to continuing activities listed above, students will work on developing and organizing files for future use and complete extensive work on their portfolios. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Electrical

    ELECTRICAL 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including basic wiring, switches, and lighting, hand and power tools as well as construction safety standards. Students will begin to learn residential wiring methods, using Romex© and low voltage wiring. They will be taught to read, interpret, follow, and draw electrical drawings and schematics. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Electrical program will be covered. At the end of the course students will be introduced to commercial wiring methods. (5 Credits)

    ELECTRICAL 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Electrician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of electrical drawings and schematics. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA Construction safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score of 70% or better. (15 Credits)

    ELECTRICAL 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical 2 course. Students will begin to work on industrial/commercial wiring methods; theories and motors; motor controls; and relays. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. Hours earned in class or on the jobsite are credited towards the Massachusetts state licensing requirements for Electricians. (15 Credits)

    Electronics

    ELECTRONICS 1

As part of the Electronics team students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Investigate basic concepts and applications of analog electronics to include power supplies, amplifiers and oscillators. Prototype analog circuits and use diagnostic instrumentation to troubleshoot. Illustrate and simulate analog circuits using computer software. Fabricate printed circuit boards and printed circuit board assemblies. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Requisites: Safety and Ethics Contract and Dress Code. (5 Credits)

    ELECTRONICS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electronics 1 course. The second in a series of three consecutive outcome-based courses in which students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Investigate basic concepts and applications of digital electronics to include logic gates, counter displays, memory registers, and data selectors. Prototypes digital circuits and use diagnostic instrumentation to troubleshoot. Illustrate and simulate digital circuits using computer software. Fabricate printed circuit boards and printed circuit board assemblies. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Requisites: Safety and Ethics Contract and Dress Code. (15 Credits)

    ELECTRONICS 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electronics 2 course. The third in a series of three consecutive outcome-based courses in which students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Use the engineering design process to investigate advanced concepts and applications of electronics to include consumer appliances, computers/peripherals, telecommunications, robotics, additive/subtractive manufacturing and drones. Encounter the entire manufacturing cycle by prototyping advanced circuits and systems using microcontrollers and microprocessors. Utilize interactive web-based instruction to supplement and complement training. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Graphic Communications

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications Exploratory course. If you’re interested in communications you will benefit from this course of study. This first in a sequential set of courses exposes students to the world of communications. Pre-press use of Macintosh and Windows computers to create printed and web designs will be explored in a real-world shop serving the school department and some local non-profit community organizations. Successful completion of this sequence of courses can earn the opportunity to receive college credit through existing articulation agreements with local colleges. Among the activities explored will be more in-depth use of the Adobe Creative Suite of software including Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Acrobat. The basics of digital photography, scanning, and web page creation are also covered. Operation of digital and offset presses and bindery and finishing skills will be used in meeting customer needs. (5 Credits)

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Digital Press Operator and teaches the skills necessary to succeed in the world of communications. The responsibilities of performing complex pre-press, print, and finishing tasks will be conducted in a real-world shop serving the school department and local non-profit community organizations. Students will create and print posters, tickets, brochures, and forms, in complex tasks utilizing the Adobe Creative Suite. Folding, binding, and finishing techniques will be more complex and students will benefit from the additional time on task. More in-depth use of digital photography and scanning for print and web page creation will be conducted. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications 2 course. The final level of study in the Graphic Communications sequence dives deeper into the skills necessary to succeed in the world of communications. Responsibilities increase in all areas and these students will be managing the business and print production. Scheduling, operator oversight, and Quality Assurance will lead to the student acquiring a certificate in Graphic Communications. Students at this level will oversee underclassmen in the creation and printing of posters, tickets, brochures, and forms, in increasingly complex tasks utilizing the Adobe Creative Suite and proprietary software. More in-depth use of digital photography and scanning for print and web page creation will be conducted. Folding, binding, and finishing techniques will be more complex and will require additional time on tasks. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Health Assisting *anticipated

    HEALTH ASSISTING 1

Health Assisting 1 will begin by offering students an overview of healthcare professions and the various occupations available in the field. The goal is to have an introductory knowledge and pre-care skills necessary to continue in the Nurse Aide curriculum. Students are introduced to the language of medicine and medical terminology, and begin studying the basic structure of the human body. The Health Assisting curriculum also includes an introduction to nutrition & introduction to geriatrics and understanding dementia. The students are taught CPR, first aid, infection control and basic anatomy and physiology. Additionally students study the structure and function of the human body, medical abbreviations, medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes. Students are taught the anatomy and physiology, diagnostic, therapeutic and pathology terms of the special senses, reproductive and integumentary systems. (5 Credits)

    Metal Fabrication *Grades 10-12 Only

    METAL FABRICATION 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Metal Fabrication exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including Mig welding, gas welding and cutting, and brake and shear use. Measuring techniques, engineering drawings, and shop math are introduced and used daily in the planning, designing and crafting of projects. Hand forged blacksmithing and ARC welding are also explored. Students will improve proficiency in basic weld operations. Craftsmanship and efficient work are encouraged. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Metal Fabrication program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    METAL FABRICATION 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Metal Fabrication 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Welder or related field. They will continue to expand their skills with the introduction of ARC welding in the flat position, metallurgy, and heat-treating, cutting and forming of metal. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    METAL FABRICATION 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Metal Fabrication 2 course. Students will be introduced to TIG welding of aluminum and ferrous metals. ARC welding will be performed in the vertical and overhead positions. Creativity is encouraged. During the course students will have the opportunity to work on real life repairs including rebuilding and maintaining heavy equipment/machinery. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    TV Broadcasting

    TV BROADCASTING 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including learning the basics of creating programming using television, camera, computer and multimedia equipment and program & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at preproduction scripting and storyboarding as well as production and postproduction editing practices. They will look to become proficient at understanding the writing and technical skills required for quality video production. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the TV Broadcasting program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Camera Operator, TV Producer, or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of “real world” roles of writers, producers, directors, actors, camerapersons, technical and audio directors, and editors. Students in this program will apply organizational production skills to produce a weekly newscast among many other projects throughout the year. Projects will demonstrate effective pre-production, production, and post-production using best practices all while reinforcing the fundamentals of digital video and broadcast journalism. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course. Students will be required to produce the daily news show “Hawks Eye View” to be shown in first period class each day. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course that requires planning, producing, and overall teamwork. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 2 course. Students will be exposed to advanced concepts in Television Production. Students enrolled in this class will be responsible for a wide variety of projects that will solidify their skills. This class covers single camera film style production. This class meets concurrently with the Television Broadcasting II so these students will serve as mentors for the TV II students. Students will direct live studio productions as well as direct and produce ENG and EFP productions. Students in this class should expect a large amount of extra-curricular production work, as they will be involved in creating their own production company and videotaping sports and school events as part of their curriculum. Students completing this course will have gained the skills and knowledge needed to advance into a college level program or seek gainful employment in a rapidly growing field. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    English

Director: Daphne Fay

The mission of the English Department is to develop the lifelong habits of reading, writing, and critical thinking in all of our students. We strive to create daily, thought-provoking learning opportunities through engaging and culturally relevant texts, rich discussion with peers, challenging writing assignments, and routine choice reading.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    ENGLISH 9

Literary selections will focus on the theme of Coming of Age and may include the following major texts: Romeo and Juliet, The Odyssey, Of Mice and Men, Lord of the Flies, Great Expectations, Fahrenheit 451, The Book Thief, Keesha’s House, and Persepolis. Additional readings will include a variety of nonfiction, poetry, and short stories that are thematically connected to the major texts. In addition to analyzing character and theme, students will examine the author’s craft through point-of-view, tone, symbolism, imagery, and other figurative language. Student writing will focus on text-based argument, synthesis, and narrative. Students will complete a series of common formative and summative assessments aligned with English Language Arts standards and departmental priorities. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    PBL ENGLISH

In this class, students are exposed to a variety of genres, including fiction, nonfiction, memoir, and poetry. Some texts overlap with Freshmen English, while others are unique to The ChangeMakers Academy. Throughout the year, students develop skills in evidence-based argument, synthesis, and writing for an authentic audience. Often, the writing is public and is intended to inspire change in our community. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    ENGLISH 10

Literary selections will focus on the theme of The Quest or The Hero’s Journey and may include the following major texts: Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Alchemist, The Catcher in the Rye, A Raisin in the Sun, A Long Way Down, Night, and Shakespeare’s Macbeth or Julius Caesar. Additional readings will include a variety of nonfiction, poetry, and short stories that are thematically connected to the major texts. In addition to analyzing character and theme, students will examine the author’s craft in more detail through point-of-view, tone, symbolism, imagery, and other figurative language. Student writing will focus on text-based argument, synthesis, and narrative. Students will complete a series of common formative and summative assessments aligned with English Language Arts standards and departmental priorities. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    ENGLISH 11

This course provides a survey of American literature through the theme of The Individual Versus The Establishment. Major texts may include: The Scarlet Letter, Walden and other transcendentalist readings, The Crucible, Fences, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, and The Things They Carried. Additional readings will include a variety of nonfiction, poetry, and short stories that are thematically connected to the major texts. Students will work toward college-level writing with a focus on evidence-based argument, literary analysis, and synthesizing research. Students will complete a series of common formative and summative assessments aligned with English Language Arts standards and departmental priorities. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    ENGLISH 12

This course provides a survey of world literature through the theme of Hubris and the Human Condition. Major texts may include: Man’s Search for Meaning, Oedipus the King and Antigone, Laughter in the Dark, Master Harold and the Boys, The Fifth Child, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Othello, or Twelfth Night. Additional readings will include a variety of nonfiction, poetry, and short stories that are thematically connected to the major texts. Students will continue to work toward college-level writing with a focus on evidence-based argument, literary analysis, and synthesizing research. Students will complete a series of common formative and summative assessments aligned with English Language Arts standards and departmental priorities. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    SOPHOMORE SYMPOSIUM: A PROJECT-BASED LEARNING WORKSHOP

Formerly Sophomore Composition, this course challenges all tenth-grade students to engage with the following question: “What is my potential to make my community a better place?” Through inquiry and exploration, students are challenged to identify problems, take action, and propose solutions that promote lasting change within their community. This process challenges groups of students to build the critical-thinking, problem-solving, public-speaking, and collaboration skills that are crucial for 21st-century success. Each May, group projects culminate in the form of capstone presentations to the public. Students share their work with an audience of peers, teachers, parents, and community members, including a panel of adults who evaluate student progress and engage in open dialogue about the issues facing our school community and beyond. (2.5 Credits)

    AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

This course demands a student’s commitment and ability to sustain a high level of academic rigor in reading and writing. Students will read for depth and breadth from a primary text, The Language of Composition, and learn about rhetorical form from a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts in order to develop skilled writing. Authors include Huxley, Plato, Machiavelli, Capote, Fitzgerald, and O’Brien along with a variety of other nonfiction sources selected for the quality of their writing: rhetoric, argument, and analysis. Each quarter will involve work pertaining to skills that prepare students for the A.P. Language and Composition exam, and all students are expected to take the A.P. Language and Composition test in May. Students must be recommended by their sophomore English teacher and gain approval before enrolling in this course. Summer reading will be addressed at the beginning of the first quarter through exams, essays, and discussions, and will be referred to throughout the year. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    AP ENGLISH LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

This course assumes the student’s commitment and ability to sustain a high level of academic performance on a daily basis. Since the final exam in this course is the College Board Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition test, each quarter will involve work pertaining to skills that prepare students for this exam. Students will read widely and deeply from both the recognized canon: Hamlet, Crime and Punishment, Jane Eyre, poetry, essays, and short stories by well-known and respected authors, and from “companion works” that illuminate the originals in a different light, for example: Rosencrantz and Guilderstern are Dead. Frequent close readings and numerous short essays will be assigned. One long research project will also comprise one third of one quarter’s grade. This is a rigorous course, and students may actually earn college credit and/or advanced standing in college by achieving a satisfactory score on the Advanced Placement Exam. Students must be recommended by their junior English teacher and gain approval before enrolling in this course. Summer reading will be addressed at the beginning of the first quarter through exams, essays, and panel discussions, and will be referred to throughout the year. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    CREATIVE WRITING

This course is designed to foster students’ creativity in writing through experimentation with a variety of different genres. The writing focus begins with personal experience and memoir and moves toward fiction and narrative techniques in short stories and poems. The year culminates with the production of a compilation of student work. (2.5 Credits)

    FILM & SOCIETY

This class will focus on how film has affected society over the course of 100+ years. We will see how films (feature and short) and documentaries throughout history reflect the time period in which they were created, through such concepts as culture, politics, art, and economics. We will critically look at films or film clips from such titles as Birth of a Nation, City Lights, The Public Enemy, Little Caesar, Snow White, The Wizard of Oz, Forrest Gump, Life is Beautiful, Dead Poets’ Society, Good Will Hunting, Hugo, Life is Beautiful, House of Flying Daggers, Les Miserables, Cinema Paradiso, The Red Balloon, Hoop Dreams, Night and Fog, Gasland, Steamboat Willie, Paperman, and others. Social issues to be discussed include racism, censorship, prohibition, the Great Depression and poverty, family relations, and many others. Students will not only study the films, but will respond to prompts concerning social issues in their classroom journals. A short film will also be required of each student.

Not only will students analyze the societal effect of these films, but film study itself will be addressed. Students will learn about the directors behind these films, the actors who portray the roles, the regional area the films hail from, and the way the films themselves are created. We will discuss film scores, cinematography, lighting, costuming, and other aspects of filmmaking. Students will write one short paper per quarter on some aspect of film or filmmaking. (2.5 Credits)

    JOURNALISM

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This course introduces students to the exciting world of print and online media. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism, as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own online publication, The Talon Tribune. (2.5 Credits)

    THIS IS AMERICA: INTERSECTIONS OF RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND CITIZENSHIP

This is a co-taught interdisciplinary course that was proposed by WHS students. In this course, students will explore themes such as intersectionality & identity, power & oppression, resistance & advocacy, and citizenship & identity. Major questions that students will examine include: How does race connect with other forms of difference such as class, gender and sexuality? How do factors such as race and class impact our opportunities and experiences? How have various social movements inspired change? And, ultimately, what does it mean to be American in our changing times? Through historical and literary study of academic and cultural texts, students will engage in seminar-style discussion of these crucial issues, conduct research, and craft their own opinions through college-preparatory writing assignments. (5 Credits)

    SPORTS, LITERATURE, & SOCIETY

Sport functions as its own literature, complete with its distinct language, characters, conflicts, themes, symbols, setting, and, points of view. We will be using a wide array of non-fiction sports writing, including articles, columns and essays, in addition to a variety of clips from TV journalism and cinematic documentaries to examine and analyze how language and image are used to establish a story: the always changing, always controversial story of sports. Readings will draw from a wide variety of contemporary and classic works. The course will use excerpts from book length works like How Soccer Explains the World (Franklin Foer), Summer of Beer and Whiskey (Edward Achorn), Autumn Glory: Baseball’s First World Series (Louis Masur), Outliers (Malcolm Gladwell), and various biographies, as well as current sports journalism from newspapers, magazines, and online sources, and clips from films such as Remember the Titans, Miracle, League of their Own, The Sandlot, and Rocky. We will look at some of the great motivational and inspirational sports speeches of all time. Writing for the course will include expository, persuasive, and journalistic assignments. For instance, students will be expected to attend WHS sporting events and report on them. Additionally, we will incorporate current technology to include blogging and infographics, thus connecting the course work to real-life experience, and offering students a chance to explore realistic sports-related career options. (2.5 Credits)

    SAT REVIEW

This course is for college preparatory students who will be taking the SAT for admission into a two- or four-year college. Coursework includes test-prep strategies and instruction for both critical reading, writing, and mathematics subtests. Students will shift between an English teacher and a math teacher during the year to prepare for all subtests. Using material from SAT preparatory sources, students will be prepared for the SAT exam in the spring. Students will be introduced to the test format, be given a diagnostic exam to determine strengths and weaknesses, be acquainted with test-taking strategies and be given numerous practice exercises. The course will be pass/fail based on attendance, effort, completion of assignments, quiz scores, progress, and participation in discussion and group work. This class will be co-taught by a math and English teacher. Therefore, students must be signed up for SAT Review in both English and math. (1.25 Credits)

    MCAS PREP

This elective is required for at-risk students who are in jeopardy of failing or have already failed the grade 10 MCAS English Language Arts test. Areas of study will include the following: developing test-taking strategies, improving composition topic development, practicing open responses, improving organization and clarity in writing, making inferences and drawing conclusions, understanding and applying literary terms and devices, and acquiring challenging words in context. Prerequisite: A WIDA sub-score of 3 or higher (2.5 Credits)

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT - ENGLISH

Academic Support is an opportunity for students to receive academic tutoring, MCAS support, in English, Math, History, or Science during the school day. Sections will be staffed with content-certified teachers. Students will participate in Academic Support for limited periods of time throughout the school year as needed to bolster academic performance. (2.5 Credits)

    English Language Learners

Director: Catherine Carney

Placement in ESL classes is determined by English language proficiency tests, grades, and teacher recommendation. Placement in SEI Math, SEI Science, SEI History, and SEI MCAS Prep is also determined by student English language proficiency, grades, and teacher recommendation. ESL instruction provides systematic, explicit, and sustained language instruction, and prepares students for general education by focusing on academic language while also attending to social instructional language.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    ESL I

This course is designed for students at the beginning/entering English language proficiency level. Students enrolled in ESL I are also enrolled in either Spanish Language Composition I or ESL Comp I.. The course focuses on developing a student’s listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English. Literacy skills such as vocabulary development, sentence structure and word order patterns, verb tenses, reading and writing skills are taught in a holistic and integrated manner and use grade level appropriate content topics to contextualize learning. Students will regularly interact with text and each other in these classes. The development of reading and writing skills, including MCAS preparation, is given strong emphasis. Students will learn how to write compositions aligned with the text types focused on in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, with a focus on narrative in ESL I. Through the implementation of DESE and teacher developed Model Curriculum Units, Students will also. research topics meaningful to them and give short individual and group presentations. Students will experience a wide array of digital and print materials and sources that introduce students to fiction, poetry, and factual writing. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, there will be frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (10 Credits)

    NATIVE LANGUAGE SPANISH LITERACY

This class is for students who speak Spanish as a first language and who are new to English and have gaps in their schooling experience and therefore gaps in the academic skills necessary for success in high school.. This class runs concurrently with ESL Literacy I. The more intensive, smaller class environment will enable the student the opportunity to catch up with Spanish speaking peers who have been schooled in consecutive years. This class will build on students’ existing Spanish Language literacy skills and use Spanish literature and non-fiction to provide a foundation to transfer English language and academic skills. Grade level expectations for reading, writing , listening and speaking will be modeled first in Spanish to assist students with transfer of skills to ESL and content area classrooms. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, there will be frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project.There is no prerequisite for this course, eligibility is determined by a language and math assessment and intake survey. (5 Credits)

    ESL II

This course is designed for students who have achieved or are approaching an emerging level of English language proficiency. Students enrolled in ESL II are also enrolled in either Spanish Language Composition II or ESL Comp II. The structure, process, and activities of ESL II are similar to those noted in ESL I. However, course content becomes more complex and additional skills are introduced and stressed. The course focuses on developing a student’s listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English. Literacy skills such as vocabulary development, sentence structure and word order patterns, verb tenses, reading and writing skills are taught in a holistic and integrated manner and use grade level appropriate content topics to contextualize learning. Students are expected to read, write, and speak with greater fluency and demonstrate growing control over basic errors as they continue to develop reading, research, presentation and writing skills. Students are introduced to the skills and strategies needed to read for meaning and inference in a second language, and are encouraged to use their cultural and first language knowledge to assist them in becoming critical thinkers. Students will continue to learn how to write compositions aligned with the text types focused on in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, with a focus on argument and expository essays in ESL II. Emphasis will also be placed on developing speaking skills that will be necessary for success in core content classes. Through the implementation of DESE and teacher developed Model Curriculum Units, Students will also. research topics meaningful to them and give short individual and group presentations, using an array of technology. Students will experience a wide array of digital and print materials and sources that introduce students to fiction, poetry, and factual writing. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, there will be frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (5 Credits)

    ESL III

This course is designed for ESL students at the intermediate/developing level of English proficiency. Students enrolled in ESL III concurrently enroll in their grade-level standard, curriculum English class. In ESL III, students apply the skills and strategies needed to read for meaning in a second language, and are expected to actively use their cultural and first language knowledge in becoming more proficient critical thinkers.

Through the use of Model Curriculum Units created by DESE and teacher teams students engage with excerpts and complete works of fiction and non-fiction text that align with grade level content expectations. Emphasis is placed upon the higher level literacy skills such as: drawing conclusions, predicting outcomes, distinguishing fact from opinion, drawing inferences, determining author’s purpose, author’s bias, determining mood/tone, and identifying problem/solution. The course addresses academic reading and writing skills that will be applied across content areas and include an analysis of literature with the emphasis on the following: the identification of major characteristics and elements of literary genres and understanding of common literary terms, literary techniques, and recurrent motifs and themes. Reading, writing, and general academic skills specific to nonfiction will also be explicitly taught and practiced to strengthen academic skills necessary for success across content areas. These will include, and are not limited to, evaluating an author’s purpose, note-taking, and prioritizing information from a text. All strategies will be introduced and practiced with both digital and print based text. Students are expected to write in a variety of text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including argument essays, creative papers, research papers with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays as well as other formative and summative assessments. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (5 Credits)

    ESL IV

This course is designed for ESL students at the expanding level of English proficiency. Students enrolled in ESL IV will be enrolled in their grade-level standard, curriculum English classes. This course focuses on mastering listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Student’s interpersonal language may have reached the level of a native speaker, but their academic language proficiency still places them at a disadvantage in content area classes taught in English. Emphasis is on attaining the English literacy skills needed to transition out of ESL classes. Students are expected to continue to read increasingly complex fiction and nonfiction text while they develop their individual voice to improve their writing of text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including argument essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays as well as other formative and summative assessments. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (5 Credits)

    ESL V

This course is designed for ESL students at the transitioning/bridging level of English proficiency. Students enrolled in ESL V will be enrolled in their grade-level standard, curriculum English classes. This course focuses on mastering reading and writing skills at the transitioning level. Student’s interpersonal language may have reached the level of a native speaker, but their academic language proficiency still places them at a disadvantage in content area classes taught in English. Emphasis is on attaining the English literacy skills needed to transition out of ESL classes and will be customized to the needs of the students in the class (as determined by the WIDA Assessment and teacher input). Students are expected to continue to read increasingly complex fiction and nonfiction text while they develop their individual voice to improve their writing of text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including argument essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays as well as other formative and summative assessments. Increasing emphasis will be placed on the Academic speaking and listening skills required to be academically competitive in core content classes. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (5 Credits)

    ESL COMPOSITION I

This course will be offered to students in ESL 1. This course will focus on the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in core content classes. Students will read, discuss, and write about a variety of fiction and non-fiction using texts that may include video, audio, tables, graphs, text features, photos, and infographics. These texts will serve as a vehicle to practice read aloud think alouds and reading for information and detail. Students will be introduced to writing text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including narrative essays, expository essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed writing prompts as well as other formative and summative assessments. The writing process will be introduced and practiced to support in-class writing and compositions that may be assigned in ESL and content classes. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (2.5 Credits)

    ESL COMPOSITION II

This course will be offered to students in ESL II. This course will focus on the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in core content classes. Students will read, discuss, and write about a variety of fiction and non-fiction using texts that may include short fiction or nonfiction, excerpts of longer work, novels, non-fiction text, video, audio, tables, graphs, text features, and infographics. These texts will serve as a vehicle to practice read aloud think alouds, reading for information and detail, determining an author’s purpose. Students will be introduced to writing text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including expository essays, argument essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays, MCAS preparation, as well as other formative and summative assessments. The writing process will be introduced and practiced to support in-class writing in class and ESL and content area assignments.In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (2.5 Credits)

    ESL COMPOSITION III

This course will be offered to students in ESL III. This course will focus on the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in core content classes. Students will read, discuss, and write about a variety of fiction and non-fiction using texts that may include short fiction or nonfiction, excerpts of longer work, novels, non-fiction text, audio, tables, graphs, text features, and infographics. These texts will represent all MESH subjects and will serve as a vehicle to practice read aloud think alouds, reading for information and detail, determining an author’s purpose. Students will be introduced to writing text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including expository essays, argument essays, creative papers, content focused research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays, MCAS preparation, as well as other formative and summative assessments. The writing process will be introduced and practiced to support in-class writing in class and ESL and content area assignments. Increased focus will be placed on peer editing and revision in ESL III Composition. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (2.5 Credits)

    SPANISH LANGUAGE COMPOSITION I

This course will be offered to Spanish speaking students in ESL I. This course will build on students exiting Spanish literacy skills to further develop academic language development in Spanish. The course will focus on the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in high school. Students will experience a range of fiction and nonfiction texts that will serve as a vehicle to practice read aloud think alouds, read for information and detail, determine author’s purpose. Students will be introduced to writing text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including narrative essays, expository essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed writing prompts as well as other formative and summative assessments. The writing process will be introduced and practiced to support in-class writing and compositions that may be assigned in ESL and content classes. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (2.5 Credits)

    SPANISH LANGUAGE COMPOSITION II

This course will be offered to Spanish speaking students in ESL I. This course will build on students exiting Spanish literacy skills to further develop academic language development in Spanish. The course will focus on the academic reading and writing skills necessary for success in high school. Students will experience a range of fiction and nonfiction texts that will serve as a vehicle to practice read aloud think alouds, read for information and detail, determine author’s purpose. Students will be introduced to writing text types aligned to the expectations of the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks including argument essays, creative papers, research projects with Works Cited, on demand timed written essays, MCAS preparation, as well as other formative and summative assessments. The writing process will be introduced and practiced to support in-class writing in class and ESL and content area assignments. Language bridging from Spanish to English will be a major component in this class. In line with the school’s focus on Project Based Learning, a variety of technology platforms will be used to conduct frequent on demand assessments, regular tasks to complete in the classroom, curriculum embedded performance assessments and a final project. (2.5 Credits)

    Fine and Performing Arts

Director: Douglas Trudeau

The Fine and Performing Arts Department provides exploratory, intermediate and advanced studies in four arts areas: Visual Arts, Music, Drama and Dance. The departments offers a variety of courses that will enhance the overall high school experience and provides a great richness to a student’s overview of the arts and culture as it exists in today’s society.

All courses are designed to activate a student’s creative mind, develop skills, techniques and knowledge. The program provides opportunities for all experience levels and every student is encouraged to participate as they explore a possible vocation, or further develop a love for the arts.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    Art

    ART I

This two-period class serves as a general introduction to studio art for students of all abilities. Students will explore a variety of media including drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, fiber and sculpture in order to give them a broad basis for personal expression. Students will be introduced to the practice of critique and analyze contemporary and historical artists from diverse cultural backgrounds in regions across the Americas and throughout the world. (2.5 Credits)

    ART II

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Students in Art II will expand their skills in a variety of 2D and 3D media- drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, fiber and sculpture while further developing their individual style and self-expression. Students will hone their skills in the practice of critique and formal analysis and examine contemporary and historical artists from diverse cultural backgrounds in regions across the Americas and around the world. Students will have the opportunity to visit local museums to further their understanding. (5 Credits)

    ADVANCED ART

Advanced Art is designed for students who want to pursue a more advanced level of art making. Students will work in all areas of art with an emphasis on 2D media, such as drawing, painting, printmaking and fiber. Students will have the opportunity to visit local museums and galleries to further expand their understanding. This course is a prerequisite for AP Drawing and Portfolio Prep courses. In this course, students start building a portfolio for college as well as the AP portfolio. A sketchbook journal will be a requirement of the course, as well as an end-of-year art exhibition. (5 Credits)

    PORTFOLIO PREPARATION

Portfolio is designed for students who want to concentrate their artistic efforts at a more advanced level and/or intend to further their education at an art school, college or university. Students work in all areas of art with an emphasis on drawing, painting, 2D and 3D design, art history and aesthetics. Students in this class must be willing to put in the extra time and effort to produce the high quality of work expected in an honors-level art course. A sketchbook journal is a requirement for this course as well as an end-of-year art exhibition. (5 Credits)

    AP DRAWING STUDIO

Advanced Placement Studio Drawing is for highly motivated students and involves a significant level of commitment and work outside of school. This course is designed for students who wish to develop mastery in the concept, composition, and execution of their ideas and will address two major concerns: 1) a sense of quality in a student's work; 2) a sustained investigation of a particular theme or concept. Upon completing AP Studio Art, students will submit a portfolio to the College Board for college credit. A sketchbook journal is a requirement for this course as well as an end-of-year art exhibition. (5 Credits)

    CERAMICS

This four-block course focuses on the methods and techniques of using clay as a media to create functional and creative works of art. The origins, nature, and qualities of clay will be explored. Craftsmanship, technical proficiency, personal expression and vision will be stressed. Students will problem-solve through the development of a series of works using traditional and non-traditional methods to express themselves through specific themes, concepts, and methods. Prior experience in ceramics is not necessary for success. A sense of adventure is! (5 Credits)

    SCULPTURE

This class offers an introductory exploration of sculpture, hand built ceramics and 3D design. Materials that will be used will be paper, wood, clay, plaster and wire. Students will learn basic tools and techniques required for 3D work. Craftsmanship, personal vision, creative expression & reflection will be of primary concern. Cultural, historical and contemporary art concepts will also be explored. No prior art experience is necessary. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS

A unique experience of problem solving and creative thinking applied to 3D media is the main focus of this advanced curriculum. Students with an interest in 3-D design will challenge themselves by developing a series of major works related to specific themes, concept, media and methods. Special attention will be paid to craftsmanship, personal vision, and creative expression. Students will take an in-depth look at various materials in order to select those that best express their personal statement in order to create 3D art of portfolio quality. Prerequisite: Sculpture OR Ceramics (5 Credits)

    GLASS

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Create 2 & 3D handcrafted designs of light, color, line, and texture. Students will safely learn to cut, grind and solder stained glass, and integrate with other non-porous materials, to create unique works of art. Employing the Tiffany Method through a series of assignments, students will use their creativity and insights to create various striking works of glass in combination with compatible materials. (2.5 Credits)

    PHOTO I

In this course we will explore how and why photographers create work and the basics of taking a successful photograph. This class will include students taking their own original photographs, learning multiple techniques on Photoshop, and analyzing and discussing historic and contemporary photographers. Use of your smart phone or personal camera is encouraged. Point-and-shoot cameras are available to all students in the course. (2.5 Credits)

    PHOTO II

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Photo II is designed for students who want to continue their exploration of photography. This course will include taking original photographs, more advanced Photoshop techniques, and engaging in deeper analysis and discussion of historic and contemporary photographers. Students will explore a variety of styles of photography and begin developing their own personal voice as an artist. Students will have the opportunity to visit local museums and galleries to further expand their understanding. Use of smartphones or personal cameras is encouraged. Point-and-shoot cameras are available to all students in the course. This art course requires weekly homework. (5 Credits)

    AP PHOTOGRAPHY

This course is designed for highly motivated students interested in continuing their exploration of photography. In this course we will take a deeper look into the work of past and contemporary photographers and explore career options within the fine art and commercial photography fields. Students will continue learning more advanced editing techniques in Photoshop and be pushed to create work that is personally significant and reflective of their interests. Students should be aware that AP work involves significantly more commitment and accomplishment than the typical high school course. AP students will submit a portfolio of work to the College Board at the end of the year for college credit. Prerequisite: Photo I, Photo II and/or teacher approval. (5 Credits)

    AP 3-D ART & DESIGN

Departmental approval is required for this rigorous course for the highly motivated artistically gifted student who intends to pursue a career in the visual arts. Participants will create work which meet the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Studio 3D Design guidelines. Students will submit works of art, digital images and reflective documentational writings & drawings, that support their inquiry-guided investigation through practice, experimentation, & revision. In the Selected Works section special attention is paid to materials, process, and ideas used. Prerequisite: Two years of a 5-credit studio class including one year in Advanced Sculpture and or AP Drawing Portfolio. (5 Credits)

    Drama and Dance

    INTRO TO THEATRE AND DANCE

This class explores the many areas of the theatre and dance world. Students will be introduced to improvisation, acting, movement and choreography, technical theater and film work. A true sampling of the many other theatre and dance courses you can advance to at WHS! No prior performance experience needed. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING I

This course focuses on the building blocks of acting and public speaking. Through a variety of professional and student written scripts, we will focus on creative drama, communication, movement, theatre games, improvisations, voice and speech, scene work and musical theatre. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING II

This intermediate course is designed to build on the acting skills introduced in Acting I. More advanced scene work, character study, self-scripting and playwriting will take the student’s acting to the next level. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED ACTING HONORS

This course is designed for students who are serious about acting and theatrical performance. We will cover in depth acting techniques and methods, monologue work, musical theatre, Shakespeare, stage combat among other subjects. Students will also have the opportunity to perform in a one act play. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for larger roles in our extracurricular plays and musicals. Can be taken as a 2 or a 4 period class. Prerequisite: Acting I, Acting II or Instructor's Approval. (5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT I

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This course offers an exciting study of physical stage and body movement for both the performing and non-performing student. Learning to relax and feel comfortable with one’s body, in front of others, is essential for all students. Choreography, construction, and quality of movement are covered. Some detail is spent on different styles of movement, dance, mime, musical theatre and various ethnic styles. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit.. Students will be invited to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. (2.5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT II

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This course is an advanced version of Stage and Body Movement I. It gives the student an opportunity to expand upon technique, skills and concepts introduced in Level I. Independent choreography and performance are stressed. Students electing Stage and Body Movement II are required to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit or may also participate in two sections simultaneously. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT INTENSIVE HONORS

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This course is designed for students who are serious about dance and theatrical performance. A majority of the class will be spent on classical dance technique, vocabulary and cover lyrical, contemporary, tap, ballet and jazz genres of dance. Time will also be spent on technical & theatrical aspects of performance in depth theories of movement, cross curricular connections and independent choreography. There is an expectation that all students will perform in this class throughout the year. This Intensive course will be averaged into the student’s GPA at Honors Level. Prerequisite: Stage & Body Movement I, II & Audition or Instructor's Approval (5 Credits)

    LATINX DANCE

This course offers an exciting study of Latinx dance and cultural dances from around the world. Students will explore the different styles of Latinx movement, with exposure to Bachata, Cha-cha-cha, Merengue, Rhumba, Salsa, Samba and Paso Doble. In addition, students will be exposed to dance, mime, musical theatre and various ethnic styles of dance worldwide. Music of Pop Latino Artists and artists from around the world will be used to create routines. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit.. Students will be invited to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. (2.5 Credits)

    STAGECRAFT AND DESIGN

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This class is for the student who is interested in a behind the scenes look at the world of theatre. This class will offer a hands on approach to scenic design and stagecraft as the students become a part of the design and construction team of all the major stage productions at the high school. The class will focus on the different facets of design including lighting, costume, sound, special effect make-up, and scenery. (2.5 Credits)

    Music

    WIND ENSEMBLE HONORS

Wind Ensemble is open to any student with previous experience playing a band instrument. Students who are members of Wind Ensemble will perform at all home football games, at the Holiday Festival of the Arts, Student Santa, winter, spring and All City Concerts, and at graduation. Each performance counts as 10% of the quarter grade. Some Wind Ensemble members will also play with the Symphony Orchestra and may be required to attend after-school rehearsals with the string players. (Usually two per concert) Additional opportunities exist for an out of state trip (such as Walt Disney World) for band members in good standing. Students will play music in a wide range of musical styles, and experience the cooperative skills needed to perform in an ensemble. (5 Credits)

    CONCERT BAND

Students enrolled in Concert Band are considered to be members of the Wind Ensemble and are required to learn all of the same music and fulfill the same responsibilities. Concert Band is a two period option available ONLY to 9th and 10th grade students who would otherwise be unable to fit Wind Ensemble into their schedule. Because of the considerable increase of difficulty in high school music, it is highly recommended that everyone take Wind Ensemble Honors if possible to ensure an enjoyable and successful band experience. (2.5 Credits)

    JAZZ BAND

In addition to the skills demonstrated in Wind Ensemble/Concert Band, Jazz Band students will be expected to become familiar with various jazz idioms from blues to big band to rock/fusion. They must demonstrate improvisational skills in class and during all in-school and evening performances. Performances at school programs and evening concerts will account for 10% of the grade. Concurrent enrollment in Wind Ensemble or Concert Band is required. (2.5 Credits)

    STRING ORCHESTRA HONORS

String Orchestra is open to any student with previous experience playing an orchestral string instrument. Students who are members of String Orchestra will perform at the Holiday Festival of the Arts, Student Santa, winter, spring and All City Concerts. Some String Orchestra members will also play for special events in the greater Waltham area. Orchestra students may be required to attend after-school rehearsal when playing Symphony Orchestra music with winds and percussion (usually two per concert). Additional opportunities exist for an out of state trip (such as Walt Disney World) for string members in good standing. Students will play music in a wide range of musical styles, using complex rhythms, in a variety of keys, using advanced techniques, and experience the cooperative skills needed to perform in an ensemble. (5 Credits)

    STRING ORCHESTRA 2

Students enrolled in String Orchestra 2 are considered to be members of the Orchestra and are required to learn all of the same music and fulfill the same responsibilities. String Orchestra 2 is a two period option available ONLY to 9th and 10th grade students who would otherwise be unable to fit String Orchestra into their schedule. Because of the considerable increase of difficulty in high school music, it is highly recommended that everyone take Honors String Orchestra if possible to receive more extensive instruction, and to ensure an enjoyable and successful orchestra experience. (2.5 Credits)

    FRESHMAN CHORUS

Freshman Chorus is an entry level high school ensemble designed to improve vocal technique and music literacy. This chorus will sing music from various styles and cultures. The group appears at several performances throughout the school year. Students who complete this course will be eligible to move to a more advanced chorus in subsequent years. (2.5 Credits)

    MUSIC UNLIMITED

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Music Unlimited is a select group of singers and dancers who perform a wide range of vocal styles from classical concert literature to popular and show choir music. Placement in this ensemble is based upon a vocal and choreography audition. This course is co-curricular and functions as both a concert choir and extra-curricular competitive show choir. This group typically rehearses Tuesdays and Thursdays, and attends competitions. Students will sing music in four or more parts from various styles and cultures. Attendance at school performances, community events, and show choir competitions is mandatory. (5 Credits)

    MUSIC EXPRESS

Music Express is a select group of singers for a non-competitive treble show choir made up of students in grades 9 - 12. Music Express performs standard choral music along with contemporary pop music such as Beyonce, Andra Day, Meghan Trainor, Bruno Mars and Pentatonix. Placement in this ensemble is based upon a vocal and choreography audition. Course expectations are to increase students’ vocal technique, sight singing, choreography, stage presence, and performance skills. Music Express performs at several concerts throughout the year. (2.5 / 5 Credits)

    MIXED CHOIR

Mixed Choir is a group of singers who work on a wide range of vocal styles from Classical to modern pop and musical theater. This course focuses on building vocal technique, sight singing, and music theory skills. This group appears at several performances throughout the school year. (2.5 / 5 Credits)

    LATINX CHOIR

Latinx Choir will perform, analyze and celebrate music from a variety of Latin cultures. We will sing music from some of the top Latin singers such as Selena, Romeo Santos, Celia Cruz, Shakira and more! This is a place where students will come together to make music based around the Latin culture and Spanish language. This group appears at several performances throughout the school year. (2.5 / 5 Credits)

    VOICE TRAINING

This course is designed for students who would like to further develop their solo singing voices. Class material will be focused around solo singing including topics such as: vocal production, breathing techniques, and expanding vocal ranges. Voice Training incorporates listening to and analyzing singers of all styles, along with preparing songs of all styles with a solo mindset. (2.5 Credits)

    MUSIC THEORY

Students taking this course are expected to learn basic concepts of music reading and writing, and apply these concepts using available music technology. Students will learn to read pitch notation on the treble and bass clef staves, and learn scales, keys, intervals, and chords as the building blocks of harmony. They will become fluent in rhythm reading in common time signatures, and learn to identify rhythm and pitch structures by ear. Students who are already advanced in this regard can enroll in AP Music Theory without taking Theory I. (2.5 Credits)

    AP MUSIC THEORY

This course is designed for those students who have a serious interest in music as a career and who plan to elect music as a major or minor beyond high school. It is strongly recommended that students have completed at least two years in a performance group, have a solid background in music theory and can display competence on a principal instrument. Theory Exam in the spring. Course content will focus on advanced concepts in Music Theory; including four part harmonization using principles of 18th century voice leading, harmonic analysis including secondary dominants and modulations, advanced sight-reading in major and minor modes, composition of a bass line and melodic dictation. Advanced projects in performance and composition will also be components of this course. Along with planned instructional activities, much of the course work will involve directed study, independent performance, music analysis, and utilization of music technology. It is expected that all students enrolled will take the Advanced Placement Exam. (5 Credits)

    INTRODUCTION TO SOUND RECORDING

This course will introduce students to the technology used in creating professional quality audio recordings. Students will be expected to use MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) applications, microphones, microphone technique, signal processing, stereo imaging, mixing, and multi-tracking in both the analog and digital realms. To demonstrate understanding of all of these areas, students will be expected to participate in the production of a number of recordings. This course is limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors who study instruments or singing. (2.5 Credits)

    ROCK MUSIC - THE FIFTIES TO PRESENT DAY

Students in this course will explore the many facets of Rock music from its early roots, beginning in the fifties , through the present day. In additional to studying the different genres of Rock music, we will discuss the political, social and economic events which influenced its development. Artists particularly important to each genre will be studied in depth to include the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, David Bowie and other artists from the second half of the 20th Century. We will also learn how to analyze instrumentation, structure and lyrics of Rock music. This unit-based course requires no previous musical experience and fulfills the required Fine Arts credited needed for graduation. (2.5 Credits)

    MUSIC AND SOCIETY: FROM ROCK TO RAP AND HIP HOP

This course will answer the phrase “How can music reflect, anticipate and challenge society?” In doing so, we will explore musical examples of various decades from the 20th and 21 centuries. From the jazz era through rap and hip hop students will discover the ways that music not only documents human events, but in many cases actually influences the direction and evolution of individual and societal thought and action. This course will allow students to analyze lyrics for meaning in context of the era they were written while making connections to events and attitudes of current times exploring the relation between music, history and sociology. We achieve this by matching various songs and stylistic musical expressions with surrounding cultural events showing how the thoughts, attitudes and actions of society are represented through music. Students will produce a variety of small Project-Based Learning assignments culminating in a final presentation. (2.5 Credits)

    SONGWRITING

This course will develop the necessary skills that will enable students to create musical compositions. Students will study various aspects of melody, rhythm, harmony, lyrics and how it relates to writing songs. This course will be personalized allowing students to choose the style/s they wish to compose in such as rock, rap, jazz, and other genres. To facilitate this course, music software programs will be utilized. Prerequisites: Students should have some prior experience in other music courses, i.e.) theory, guitar, keyboard, band, orchestra, or one of our choral programs. They should already be familiar with basic note reading. (2.5 Credits)

    BEGINNING PIANO CLASS

This class is open to all students who wish to learn to play the piano. It is intended for students with little or no prior piano experience. Students will learn to read treble and bass clef, play with both hands, and play multiple keys and positions. Students may be asked to improvise or compose a song with a melody line and chords. Periodic worksheets and assessments will be given to strengthen understanding of musical concepts. (2.5 Credits)

    BEGINNING GUITAR

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This course is for students who wish to begin the study of guitar. Students will learn to play open position major, minor, and dominant chord progressions, recognize note values and associated rhythms, read and play melodies in open finger position, have small group performances in the blues, classical and pop/rock styles and develop improvisational and compositional techniques utilizing the 12 bar blues structure. All of the above will be assessed through in-class performance and recitals. A limited number of school guitars will be available and assigned to students at the discretion of the teacher. (2.5 Credits)

    INTERMEDIATE GUITAR

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This class will cover more advanced guitar skill development in various styles, building on areas covered in Beginning Guitar. Material covered includes movable Barre chord forms, major and minor pentatonic scale patterns across the neck, reading in the fifth position, more advanced improvisation techniques within a variety of musical styles and composing using all of the above. As with Beginning Guitar, there will be recitals and performance. A limited number of school guitars will be available, assigned at the teacher’s discretion. (2.5 Credits)

    GUITAR ENSEMBLE

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Guitar Ensemble is a performance based class that will follow Intermediate Guitar in the guitar sequence. Students enrolling in Guitar Ensemble will continue their studies in reading standard guitar notation, improvisational skills and chord patterns. Repertoire will be chosen from a variety of styles including classical, jazz, Latin, rock, blues and other contemporary forms. Students will learn to play individual guitar parts which then come together as a group performance. Guitar Ensemble will perform at the in-school winter and Spring Concerts. There can also be off-campus performance opportunities as well throughout the year. Class participation and presentations are a significant aspect of this course. Guitar Ensemble may be repeated each year for credit. (2.5 Credits)

    HONORS GUITAR ENSEMBLE

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Honors Guitar Ensemble is a four-period class that is designed to offer an extension of the two-period Guitar Ensemble Class. Students electing to take the Honors level will be responsible for meeting all the requirements of Guitar Ensemble. Additionally, Honors candidates will study scales, modes, chord voicings, theory, ear training, improvisational techniques in a variety of styles and advanced rhythms in greater depth as it relates to improvising, composition, note reading and repertoire. Class participation and presentations are a significant aspect of this course. Honors Guitar Ensemble may be repeated each year for credit. (5 Credits)

    History and Social Sciences

Director: Derek Vandegrift

The WHS History and Social Studies department strives to fulfill the vision statement that opens the Massachusetts History and Social Science Framework: “All Massachusetts students will be educated in the histories of the Commonwealth, the United States, and the world. They will be prepared to make informed civic choices and assume their responsibility for strengthening equality, justice, and liberty in and beyond the United States.”

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    MODERN WORLD HISTORY

This course is an in-depth examination of events and concepts of world history from the French Revolution to the present. It emphasizes how these developments have created our modern world, and analyzes present-day movements and problems in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Assignments from the text, analysis of primary sources, and supplemental readings are required. Research papers, projects, and novels are also assigned. Traditional as well as computer aided research skills will be emphasized. Each student will be assigned a formal, detailed research project. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in June. (5 Credits)

    PBL HISTORY

This course is an in-depth examination of events and concepts of world history from the French Revolution to the present. It emphasizes how these developments have created our modern world, and analyzes present-day movements and problems in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Students will analyze primary sources, the textbook, and supplemental readings, and develop arguments on the complex and subtle impact of Modern World History on today’s world. Students will articulate their understanding through projects, debates, research papers, and community outreach. (WHS HSS MassCore Component 1) (5 Credits)

    SEI MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Typically, limited to students enrolled in ESL I, II, III or ESL Literacy, this course focuses on the major events and outstanding personalities that shaped world history from the French Revolution to the present day are taught using Sheltered English Immersion methods. The growth of world religions and the historical and cultural influences of China, Japan, Africa, Latin America and the nations of Europe will be presented as well as major global events of the twentieth century. Students will participate in class discussions and maintain a current notebook. Listening, speaking, reading, writing, study, and computer skills will be practiced through the study of world history. In addition to quizzes, tests, reports, and projects there will be a final examination in June. Standards outlined in The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. (5 Credits)

    UNITED STATES HISTORY I

Beginning a sequence of United States history that will be completed in Grade 11, this course will study the United States from the American Revolution to the close of the nineteenth century. The course aims to deepen students’ understanding of the history of pre-twentieth century America. Special emphasis will be placed on the study of the Founding Documents, the Early Republic, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and industrialization. Homework and outside readings will be assigned regularly. Students will read several historical selections throughout the year as well as two historical novels. In addition, students will use primary and secondary source materials to complete a substantial term paper. Traditional and computer aided research skills will be a significant component of the course. A cumulative final examination will be administered in June. Prerequisite Course: Modern World History Recommended. (5 Credits)

    SEI UNITED STATES HISTORY I

Typically limited to ESL I, II, III or ESL Literary students, this course introduces students to American history from the Revolutionary period to the close of the nineteenth century. Students are exposed to the American Constitution, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Industrialization, and Immigration. Coverage is provided in a variety of formats that support the listening, speaking, reading, and writing needs of ELL students. Students keep a notebook. There are frequent quizzes, tests, reports, projects, and a final exam. Standards outlined in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks for Social Studies and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. (5 Credits)

    AP UNITED STATES HISTORY

This is an intensive course in United States history conducted at a college level exploring United States history from the period of pre-Columbus America to the present. Primary source documents, the work of prominent historians, and major social, cultural, economic and political trends will be studied and discussed. In-depth historical research and independent study will be expected of the student who enrolls in this course. Students are also expected to take the Advanced Placement exam at the end of the year. Such works as Democracy in America, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, the Jungle, Only Yesterday and others will be read and analyzed. Prerequisite: Maintaining a B average in two years of Social Studies courses at the high school honors level, approval of the sophomore honors teacher and director is required. Prerequisite Courses: Modern World History, US History I. (5 Credits)

    UNITED STATES HISTORY II

Completing the sequence of United States history begun in Grade 10, this course explores American history from the Age of Imperialism to the present day. This is an honors course and, as such, the pace and course materials will be rigorous. Primary source materials are used extensively. Each student is required to complete several research projects, and to read novels reflecting historical periods studied. A formal, detailed term paper is also required, based on traditional and computer-aided research. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in June. Prerequisite Courses: Modern World History, US History I. (5 Credits)

    SEI UNITED STATES HISTORY II

This is the second course in the American history sequence that exposes the ESL I, II, III or ESL Literacy students to American history from the turn of the nineteenth century to the present era. Students cover the Imperialism, Immigration, WWI, WWII, the Cold War, and the post Cold War period through present day. Coverage is provided in a variety of formats that support the listening, speaking, reading, and writing needs of ELL students. Students keep a notebook. There are frequent quizzes, tests, reports, projects, and a final exam. Standards outlined in The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. (5 Credits)

    PSYCHOLOGY

This course is designed to introduce major schools of psychological theory and practice including personality theory, child development, human motivation, emotions, behaviorism, and abnormal psychology. Included in the program of study will be the contributions of Freud, Skinner, Maslow, Rogers, Jung, Fromm and others. Students will read materials representing humanist, existential, psychoanalytic and other schools of thought. Research projects based on extensive readings will be required. This is an honors course open to interested and capable students and is comparable to a college introductory psychology course. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in May. (5 Credits)

    AP PSYCHOLOGY

This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Psychology developed by the College Board. It is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology; including, but not limited to, abnormal, developmental, biological, and cognitive psychology. This course is designed to prepare motivated college bound students for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring, and taking the exam is a course requirement. At most institutions of higher learning, a passing grade on the test can be counted as college credit and will exempt the student from introductory psychological study. (WHS HSS Additional Core / Learning Opportunity) Prerequisite Courses: Modern World History, US History I and II. (5 Credits)

    SOCIOLOGY

This course is for students who are interested in an in-depth study of how people interact in groups. Students will be expected to construct and use the tools of sociologists, such as surveys, behavioral observations and documented research. Required work will include participation in group projects and presentations, analysis of sociological trends in written and discussion formats, and the reading of the class text as well as other supplemental books. Students will study such topics as adolescence, personality development, deviant behavior and social control, the nature of prejudice, and the influence of heredity and environment on human behavior. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in May. (5 Credits)

    CONSTITUTIONAL & CRIMINAL LAW

This course is a detailed and rigorous examination of the Massachusetts criminal justice system, as well as an in-depth analysis of individual civil liberties and their basis in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Landmark American trials, key constitutional cases, and current legal issues are extensively reviewed. Current criminology theories will be examined and researched. Students will be asked to complete research papers, prepare legal briefs, participate in mock trials, read Truman Capote’s classic non-fiction work, In Cold Blood, and Lara Bricker’s book Lie after Lie, describing the successful investigation by the Waltham Police Department in the recent “anti-freeze” murder case. Students will view trials in Suffolk Superior Court and interview a Superior court judge. The course features guest lectures by Waltham police officers, state police officials, district attorneys and defense lawyers. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered. (5 Credits)

    HISTORY OF WALTHAM

This course will provide students with an intensive study of some of the major topics in local history including the English settlement of Waltham, Waltham in the Revolutionary War, Waltham’s role in the industrial revolution, immigration into the city, the development of neighborhoods and downtown Waltham, and the impact of Route 128 on the city. Students will also examine Waltham’s geography, architecture, local government, and current issues facing the city. Primary source documents will be analyzed, and students will visit historical sites of interest. Students will also develop their own original research project on Waltham’s history. Field trips and guest speakers are part of the course. (5 Credits)

    AP MICROECONOMICS

This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Microeconomics developed by the College Board. Students pursuing this course of study must be self-motivated learners interested in pursuing advanced economic study. Students will analyze basic economic systems, supply and demand, models of consumer choice, the behavior of firms, product pricing, government economic policy, factor markets and efficiency. This course is designed to prepare college bound students for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring, and taking the exam is a course requirement. At most institutions of higher learning, a passing grade on the test can be counted as college credit and will exempt the student from introductory economic study. Not to be taken with any other class in the field of economics. (5 Credits)

    AP MACROECONOMICS

Strongly recommended for students who have successfully completed Advanced Placement Microeconomics. This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum for macroeconomics developed by the College Board. Students must be self-motivated learners interested in pursuing advanced economic study building on their foundation of economic knowledge established in Advanced Placement Microeconomics (346). After a review of basic concepts, students will study topics such as: economic performance measurement, national income and price determination, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, unemployment, stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance. This course is designed to prepare college bound seniors for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring, and taking the exam is a course requirement. At most institutions of higher learning, a passing grade on the test can be counted as college credit and will exempt the student from introductory economic study. (5 Credits)

    CURRENT ISSUES

This student-driven course will examine events happening now that will affect our lives in the future. It will evaluate the impact news coverage and reporting have on our understanding of current world history. What sort of stories make it into the news and why? Who decides which stories are reported and from what angle? Students will investigate how events are reported, compare different media reports of the same event and analyze the consequences of instant reporting of events through various media outlets. Comparisons will also be made between recent news reports and similar past events. Students will be required to read and watch daily reports while comparing and reacting to their content and point of view. Students will be asked to complete several critical analysis projects and assignments, culminating with a final point of view project at the end of the academic year. (2.5 Credits)

    AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum developed by the College Board for the study of European history since 1450 and introduces students to cultural, economic, political, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which we live. In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals are to understand the principal themes in modern European history, to have an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and the ability to express historical understanding in writing. The course is designed to prepare college bound students for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring and taking the exam is a course requirement. Prerequisite: Students must have taken and passed Modern World History, United States History I & II. At most colleges and universities a passing grade on the exam is counted as college credit. (5 Credits)

    AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

This course will provide students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students successfully completing this course will be expected to learn important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government; understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences; be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics; be able to critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, and apply them appropriately. The main thrust of the course, however, is to be able to apply an understanding of our political system to contemporary events. Students will conclude this course with the Advanced Placement Exam in this subject. (5 Credits)

    CIVICS - GOVERNMENT, AND CITIZENSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY

This course will begin with an examination of the foundations of American government but through readings, discussion, film, and research, students will explore how our system of government has changed over time. The structure and function of the government will be analyzed on a national, state, and local level while showing how each level is interrelated. Students will examine how the concept of civic participation has evolved and will investigate the rights and responsibilities of citizens in our modern world. Throughout the course we will focus on how citizens can play an active role in our government and show how individuals, through civic participation, can shape our society. (5 Credits)

    THIS IS AMERICA: INTERSECTIONS OF RACE, CLASS, GENDER, AND CITIZENSHIP

This is a co-taught interdisciplinary course that was proposed by WHS students. In this course, students will explore themes such as intersectionality & identity, power & oppression, resistance & advocacy, and citizenship & identity. Major questions that students will examine include: How does race connect with other forms of difference such as class, gender and sexuality? How do factors such as race and class impact our opportunities and experiences? How have various social movements inspired change? And, ultimately, what does it mean to be American in our changing times? Through historical and literary study of academic and cultural texts, students will engage in seminar-style discussion of these crucial issues, conduct research, and craft their own opinions through college-preparatory writing assignments. (5 Credits)

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT - History & Social Sciences

Academic Support is an opportunity for students to receive academic tutoring, MCAS support, in English, Math, History, or Science during the school day. Sections will be staffed with content-certified teachers. Students will participate in Academic Support for limited periods of time throughout the school year as needed to bolster academic performance. (2.5 Credits)

    Mathematics

Director: Valerie Alfeo

The mission of the Mathematics Department is to develop mathematical understanding and to extend computation through cognitively demanding mathematical tasks, which are represented in multiple ways, such as visual diagrams, manipulatives, symbols, and problem situations. Making connections among multiple representations helps develop meaning. In order to find solutions and make the connections, students must draw on their knowledge and skills, act on their curiosity, and develop the habit of perseverance.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    ALGEBRA 1

This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Algebra 1. Model Algebra I focuses on four critical areas: (1) deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships; (2) contrast linear and exponential relationships with each other and engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions; (3) extend the laws of exponents to square and cube roots; and (4) apply linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Prerequisite Course: Grade 8 Mathematics. Requirement: Students in this course will be concurrently enrolled in Physics. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    PBL ALGEBRA

Students will put math into action through interdisciplinary work. This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Algebra 1. Algebra students will explore a variety of function families and investigate linear, exponential, and quadratic relationships. They will compare and contrast these relationships and use them to solve a variety of problems. Through a series of real life problems and interdisciplinary projects, students will use the functions to model and analyze data and draw conclusions. Prerequisite Course: Grade 8 Mathematics. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    SEI ALGEBRA 1

Limited to students enrolled in ESL I or ESL II, this course will integrate Algebra with Geometry for students who are learning English. Students will develop algebraic concepts, acquire competency in algebraic computation and problem solving as well as learning the vocabulary of Math and reading for Math applications. Students will develop skills in working with polynomials, linear equations, quadratic equations and their connections with geometry as well as practical applications. Standards outlined in The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    SEI TRANSITIONAL MATH

Limited to students enrolled in ESL I or ESL II who are not quite ready for SEI Algebra 1, this course will integrate middle school math standards to fill in gaps that students may have (operations with signed numbers, exponents, basic graphing, percentages, geometry). Standards outlined in The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    NEWCOMER MATH

Students enrolled in this class have been identified for the Newcomer program through assessments and intake interviews. These are students new to the United States, new to English, and with demonstrated gaps in knowledge necessary for success in US schools. Students will be individually assessed to identify the strengths and knowledge that each brings to expand the foundational math knowledge necessary for success on the Math MCAS and subsequent math courses. This course will introduce middle school math standards to fill in gaps that students may have (parts of a whole, operations with signed numbers, exponents, basic graphing, percentages, geometry). Standards outlined in The Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    GEOMETRY

This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Geometry. Model Geometry focuses on six critical areas: (1) establish criteria for congruence of triangles based on rigid motions; (2) establish criteria for similarity of triangles based on dilations and proportional reasoning; (3) informally develop explanations of circumference, area, and volume formulas; (4) apply the Pythagorean Theorem to the coordinate plan; (5) prove basic geometric theorems; and (6) extend work with probability. Prerequisite Courses: Grade 8 Algebra 1. NOTE: Grade 9 students in this course will be concurrently enrolled in Physics. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    PBL GEOMETRY

Students will put math into action through interdisciplinary work. This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Geometry. Students will investigate transformations, area, conditions for triangle similarity and congruence, trigonometric ratios and probability models. They will develop explanations of circumference, volume, and area formulas for polygons and prove basic geometric theorems. Students will apply their learning through a series of real life problems and interdisciplinary projects. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    SEI GEOMETRY

Limited to students enrolled in ESL I or ESL II, students will acquire proficiency in reading for understanding of mathematical concepts, refine skills in algebraic computation, and develop understanding of the application of mathematics through critical thinking and problem solving. Geometry, data analysis, and probability will be integrated. Linear and parabolic functions and their applications will be studied in conjunction with their applications. Standards outlined in the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts English Language Proficiency Benchmarks and Outcomes guide the course curriculum. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    ALGEBRA 2

This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Algebra 2. Model Algebra 2 focuses on four critical areas: (1) relate arithmetic of rational expressions to arithmetic of rational numbers; (2) expand understandings of functions and graphing to include trigonometric functions; (3) synthesize and generalize functions and extend understanding of exponential functions to logarithmic functions; and (4) relate data display and summary statistics to probability and explore a variety of data collection methods. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1 and Geometry. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    PRECALCULUS

This course addresses the Common Core Standards for Model Precalculus. Model Precalculus focuses on four critical areas: (1) extend work with complex numbers; (2) expand understanding of logarithms and exponential functions; (3) use characteristics of polynomial and rational functions to sketch graphs of those functions; and (4) perform operations with vectors. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    APPLICATIONS IN HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS

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This course complements our Geometry and Algebra 2 courses. It will review the standards from these courses by utilizing a project-based approach to review and use the standards to solve both home and job-based application problems. Students should take this class if they are not yet ready for Precalculus, but would to improve their high school mathematics skills in preparation for choosing a college major, planning a career path, or for use in day-to-day life. Assessments for the course are mostly project-based, so students signing up should be independent and motivated workers during class time. Topics will include unit conversion, measurement, logical thinking, personal finance, data analysis and organization, probability, and modeling with geometry. If you have ever asked yourself, "When will I use this math?” this may be the course for you! Prerequisite courses: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    TOPICS IN ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY

This course complements Algebra 2 C2. The course uses a standards-based approach to the study of algebra 3. Students should take this course if they are not ready for precalculus and if they would like to improve their current math skills, expand their mathematical knowledge in preparation for college level mathematics, and learn how mathematics is applied in various subject areas. The course includes such topics as quadratic equations, exponents, radicals, trigonometry, logarithms, statistics, probability, data analysis, problem solving techniques, and applications of concepts covered in algebra 1, geometry, and algebra 2. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS STANDARDS FOR HIGH SCHOOL

All students on an EPP (Educational Proficiency Plan) are required to take and pass a mathematics course during their senior year. This course is for those students who need an alternative to fill the EPP requirement for graduation. The course will cover topics that prepare students for an end of course proficiency exam. Students will need to pass the course as a graduation requirement. The exam will address the high school mathematics content in the Massachusetts Frameworks. The course will also prepare students for topics they may encounter in a college math course. Topics addressed will come from the following conceptual categories: Number and Quantity, Algebra, Functions, Modeling, Geometry, and Statistics and Probability. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. (5 Credits)

    CALCULUS

This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of calculus. The course surveys the main topics of calculus dealing with differential calculus, some integral calculus, and analytical geometry in the plane. It leans heavily on the intuitive approach with an emphasis on physical applications. Use of a graphing calculator is required. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1-2, Geometry, and Precalculus. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    AP CALCULUS AB

This is a course for the mathematically proficient student. The course uses a standards-based approach to the study of calculus and follows the established AP curriculum for calculus at the AB level. Students in this course are required to take the AB level Advanced Placement Examination in Calculus. The course combines theoretical development with sound problem solving techniques. Use of a graphing calculator is required. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1-2, Geometry, and Precalculus. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    AP CALCULUS BC

This is a course for the mathematically advanced student. The course uses a standards-based approach to the study of calculus and culminates the study of the most rigorous aspects of mathematics at the school. It follows the established AP curriculum for calculus at the BC level. Students in this course are required to take either the AB or BC level Advanced Placement Examination in Calculus. The approach combines a strong theoretical development with sound training in technique and the use of multiple representations of the solutions to problems. Use of a graphing calculator is required. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1-2, Geometry, and Precalculus. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS

This course is meant to provide an enjoyable challenge to students who have excelled in math classes at WHS. Specifically, this courses introduces students to new mathematical tools, drawn from linear algebra and multivariable calculus, for analyzing and describing two and three dimensional space. More generally, the course pushes students to think, argue, and communicate with clarity and rigor through genuine mathematical proofs. To be eligible for this course, a student must either (1) complete AP Calculus (AB or BC) with a grade of "B" or better prior to enrollment or (2) enroll concurrently in AP Calculus (BC). This class meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    STATISTICS

This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of statistics and probability. It is designed so that students will discover how to use probability and statistics to research and analyze data, compare results, and document how statistics are used and misused on a daily basis. A statistics calculator and statistical application software will be used. Connections to functions, both algebraic and trigonometric, will be introduced in the latter part of the course. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    AP STATISTICS

This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of statistics and probability. It follows the established AP curriculum for Statistics and is designed for the mathematically advanced student. Students in this course are required to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Statistics. Students will use sophisticated techniques of probability, statistics, data collection, research, data analysis, a statistics calculator, statistical application software, and algebraic and trigonometric functions. Connections to real world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite Courses: Algebra 1-2, Geometry, and Precalculus. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. This course meets the recommendations for a math class outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    SAT REVIEW

This course is designed for a focused college preparatory student who will be taking the SAT for admission into a two or four-year college. Using material from several SAT preparatory sources, students will be prepared for the SAT exam in the spring. Students will be introduced to the test format, be given a diagnostic exam to determine strengths and weaknesses, be acquainted with test taking strategies and be given numerous practice exercises. A letter grade will be given based on attendance, effort, completion of assignments, quiz scores, progress, and participation in discussions and group work. This class will be co-taught by a math and English teacher. (1.25 Credits)

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT - MATH

Study Math is an opportunity for students to receive academic tutoring and support in math, by a math teacher, during the school day. Students will have the opportunity to work with others in the class who are taking the same math course to strengthen their knowledge and skills, as well as receive support from the teacher. Students who have struggled in their previous math courses should highly consider signing up for this course.(2.5 Credits)

    INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING

This course is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. The course will focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. Specifically, students will learn about Python and HTML. The goal of Introduction to Programming is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues. (5 Credits)

    CYBERSECURITY

Cybersecurity introduces the tools and concepts of cybersecurity and encourages students to create solutions that allow people to share computing resources while protecting privacy. Nationally, computational resources are vulnerable and frequently attacked; in Cybersecurity, students solve problems by understanding and closing these vulnerabilities. This course raises students’ knowledge of and commitment to ethical computing behavior. It also aims to develop students’ skills as consumers, friends, citizens, and employees who can effectively contribute to communities with a dependable cyber-infrastructure that moves and processes information safely. (5 Credits)

    AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

AP Computer Science Principles provides students the opportunity to use programming, computational thinking and data analytics to create digital artifacts and documents representing design and analysis in areas including the Internet, algorithms, and the impact that these have on science, business, and society. Students use computational tools and techniques including abstraction, modeling, and simulation to collaborate in solving problems that connect computation to their lives. Students complete three creative projects, two collaborative programming projects, and an individual research and writing project on the impact of a recent, computing innovation that appeals to them. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. (5 Credits)

    AP COMPUTER A

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course in computer science. Students will be introduced to different topics in computer science such as design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. Students who have taken AP Computer Science Principles will build on their knowledge of programming with this course. The Java language will be used to problem solve and work through coding projects. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. Prerequisites: AP Computer Science Principles, AP Calculus AB or BC, or currently taking AP Calculus AB or BC. (5 Credits)

    Physical Education

Director: Steven LaForest

The Waltham High School Physical Education curriculum aligns with both the National Association Standards for Physical Education and Standard 2 of the Massachusetts Comprehensive Health Curriculum Frameworks. Courses are designed to develop and challenge students physically, mentally, and socially (Cognitive: knowledge, Affective: growth in feelings or emotional areas, and Psychomotor: manual or physical skills). Each course provides students with an opportunity to grow as individuals in a physically challenging environment. Students will learn and be able to develop the skills and the knowledge to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness. We learn best by moving. Our bodies and minds are completely interconnected and interdependent. Movement stimulates the mind to create more nerve connections, promoting more learning potential.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    FRESHMAN PERSONAL FITNESS & WELLNESS

This course is an introduction to health related fitness and wellness. This is a semester course (1/2 year) that combines with Freshman Health and Wellness to give all freshman a year of Wellness. The curriculum is comprised of a Scope and Sequence which will guide individuals in developing a quality personal fitness plan. Throughout the course students will collect fitness data, develop personal goals, and utilize safety procedures that will enhance their health/fitness and wellness. This unit culminates with students designing individualized fitness plan that can be used during the individual activities that will be introduced during the year. Students will also have the opportunity to learn CPR. (1.25 Credits)

    FRESHMAN HEALTH AND WELLNESS

This is a required course is an introduction to health and wellness. This is a half year semester course that will be paired with Freshman Personal Fitness and Wellness. Topics include 1. Health and Wellness (including stress management, decision making, goal setting), 2. The Human Body Systems as they relate to health and fitness (Skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiopulmonary, integumentary) 3. Nutrition and the Digestive System 4. Disease Prevention (including immune system, skin cancer, lifestyle diseases and infectious diseases) 5. Refusal Skills/Addiction, 6. Substance Abuse Prevention (including tobacco, e-cigarettes, vape, opiates, marijuana, prescription drugs, alcohol), 7. Healthy Relationships/Violence Prevention (including bullying, harassment and dating violence), 8. Reproductive and Sexual Health, 9. Mental and Emotional Health (including stress, anxiety, depression and suicide). (1.25 Credits)

    SOPHOMORE PROJECT ADVENTURE

This course is designed to promote self-confidence, group cooperation, and problem solving skills in a mutually supportive environment. The course is divided into three distinct phases. The initial activities are designed to develop trust and mutual support among group members. The second phase emphasizes group cooperation and problem solving skills. The initiative problems presented require a full contribution from every member of the group. The final activities in this course are designed to encourage risk taking and to develop self-confidence. These activities include working on the ropes course located at the high school. Students are not mandated to participate on the high elements but are encouraged to try. Students will also use Cooperative activities through team sports to continue supporting their group or team members. Sports will include Basketball, Hockey, and Soccer. (2.5 Credits)

    JUNIOR PERSONAL FITNESS & WELLNESS

This course is a continuation of the Freshman Fitness curriculum. Students will build on prior knowledge gained and apply the fitness principles to various movements and modalities. Students will learn the value of Nutrition as it relates to Metabolism and the benefits of physical activity with regards to mental health. Students will establish goals based on fitness assessment data in order to develop, implement, achieve, and monitor an individual health and fitness plan. Students will apply these principles during the activities within the curriculum. Students will have the opportunity within this class to try additional individual activities such as: Archery, Orienteering, Table Tennis, and Yoga during the school year. (2.5 Credits)

    SENIOR FITNESS & ADVENTURE LEARNING

12th grade will be Adventure Learning based. This course will be an extension of the learning experience they had in their sophomore Project Adventure Class. Students in this course will participate in more advanced climbs, and learn how to facilitate problem solving initiatives, as well as how to lead various Sophomore Project Adventure activities/games. Students will also use strategies they have learned through Adventure Learning and implement them into team sports such as Football, Volleyball, and Invasion Games. (2.5 Credits)

    BUILDING LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES THROUGH FITNESS

This course is a combination of classroom and fitness activities that will help students develop and explore leadership principles. The connection between fitness and leadership goes back thousands of years to when “fit to lead” literally meant that a person was physically fit enough to lead a community. Students will be challenged both mentally and physically as they explore the connection between physical exercise and leadership skill building. The primary objectives of this course would be:

  • Self Awareness (What is the student’s True North)
  • Developing Core Values
  • Discipline
  • Staying Positive, Sharing a Vision, and Working Together
  • Service Leadership and other Leadership Models
Students who have an interest in being a leader may have a particular interest in this course. This course is designed to take a student out of their comfort zone and push them to improve mentally and physically. This course requires the approval of a HS teacher, club advisor, or a coach. (2.5 Credits)

    Science and Health

Director: Heather Metallides

The mission of the Science and Health Department is to provide students with a high quality, hands-on, rigorous education that will prepare them to be college and career ready. We strive to create a community of learners that are scientifically and health literate who can make informed decisions based on evidence. We hope to inspire our students with a love and enthusiasm for health and science and a spirit of inquiry that will make a positive impact on their lives and the lives of people in their community.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    Health

    FRESHMAN HEALTH AND WELLNESS

This is a required course is an introduction to health and wellness. This is a half year semester course that will be paired with Freshman Personal Fitness and Wellness.

Topics include 1. Health and Wellness (including stress management, decision making, goal setting), 2. The Human Body Systems as they relate to health and fitness (Skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiopulmonary, integumentary) 3. Nutrition and the Digestive System 4. Disease Prevention (including immune system, skin cancer, lifestyle diseases and infectious diseases) 5. Refusal Skills/Addiction, 6. Substance Abuse Prevention (including tobacco, e-cigarettes, vape, opiates, marijuana, prescription drugs, alcohol), 7. Healthy Relationships/Violence Prevention (including bullying, harassment and dating violence), 8. Reproductive and Sexual Health, 9. Mental and Emotional Health (including stress, anxiety, depression and suicide). (1.25 Credits)

    FRESHMAN PERSONAL FITNESS & WELLNESS

This is course is an introduction to health related fitness and wellness. This is a semester course (1/2 year) that combines with Freshman Health and Wellness to give all freshman a year of Wellness. The curriculum is comprised of a Scope and Sequence which will guide individuals in developing a quality personal fitness plan. Throughout the course students will collect fitness data, develop personal goals, and utilize safety procedures that will enhance their health/fitness and wellness. This unit culminates with students designing individualized fitness plan that can be used during the individual activities that will be introduced during the year. Students will also have the opportunity to learn CPR. (1.25 Credits)

    HONORS HEALTH SCIENCE

This is a course for the honors student who plans to pursue or who is interested in a career in any of the allied health professions. Students will gain an understanding of the human body as it relates to the causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Students will learn about various allied health careers and relevant medical terminology for these careers. Other topics include human development, bioethics, food policy, and reproductive health. This class will include labs such as taking blood pressures, EKG’s, vital signs, lung auscultation, cardiovascular labs and monitoring oxygen saturation. . Honors Health Science may be taken concurrently with another science course. This course fulfills a unit of “Additional Core Courses" for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    CURRENT HEALTH

This is a course about you and how the quality of your life is affected by smoking, drugs, alcohol, sleep, nutrition, fitness, stress management, and other lifestyle choices. The life cycle is explored from conception to birth including parenting. Other topics include the body systems, reproductive health, genetic diseases, decision-making, goal setting, and relationships. Students will explore current issues and trends in health through online, newspaper, and magazine sources. This course will help you deepen your awareness of the above topics and give you the tools you need to live your healthiest life. This course fulfills a unit of “Additional Core Courses" for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    STRESS MANAGEMENT/VIOLENCE PREVENTION

The first half of the year, students will examine the effects of stress on the body and mind, as well as the impact stress has on one’s health, wellness, and quality of life. Students will learn how to recognize stress as well as effective strategies for managing and coping with the stressors in their daily life. In addition, students will increase their concentration and focus and create a healthy life balance that will allow them to reduce stress and increase productivity.

The second half of the year, the course will shift to Violence Prevention: Hawk Strong where students will examine a variety of issues including bullying, harassment, dating violence, sexual assault, and the impact of the media in society. Students will explore the sources of violence in school and society and will develop skills to prevent and combat violent situations acquiring effective conflict resolution skills to foster personal growth. Particular attention will be paid to dating violence and the importance of developing healthy relationships. (2.5 Credits)

    NUTRITION, FOOD, AND FITNESS

This class looks into proper nutrition for anyone who wants to be at their best. The course will cover the major components of good nutrition for men and women and the development of lifelong healthy eating habits. The topics in this class include: eating for success, proper hydration and fluid replacement, supplements, vitamins and minerals, metabolism, anaerobic vs. aerobic exercise, injuries resulting from poor nutrition, the proper amount of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in the diet, and eating disorders. (2.5 Credits)

    Science

    FRESHMAN CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS

This is an introductory physics course for students concurrently enrolled in Geometry or Algebra. Students will learn important science related skills including experimental design, accurate measurement using a variety of instruments and technologies, quantitative and qualitative observations, construction and interpretation of graphs, application of algebra to science problems, and applications of science concepts to the real world. This activity-based course will provide the foundation for all future science courses. Laboratory experiments will examine forces, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves, light, sound and heat. This course engages students in activities that help them to conceptualize key physics concepts before introducing mathematical approaches. Upon completion of the course, students will take the Introduction to Physics MCAS exam. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    PBL PHYSICS

This is an introductory physics course. In this activity-based class, students will learn important science related skills including experimental design, accurate measurement using a variety of instruments and technologies, quantitative and qualitative observations, construction and interpretation of graphs, application of algebra to science problems, and applications of science concepts to the real world. Laboratory experiments will examine forces, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves, light, sound and heat. This course engages students in activities and projects that help them to conceptualize key physics concepts before introducing mathematical approaches. Upon completion of the course, students will take the Introduction to Physics MCAS exam. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (6.25 Credits)

    SEI PHYSICS

This course is limited to students enrolled in ESL I or II, This course prepares ESL students for the state science exam in physics. This is a physics course in which students will learn important science related skills including experimental design, accurate measurement using a variety of instruments and technologies, quantitative and qualitative observations, construction and interpretation of graphs, application of algebra to science problems, and applications of science concepts to the real world. This activity-based course will provide the foundation for all future science courses. Lab experiments will examine forces, motion, electricity, magnetism, waves light, sound and heat. Students must be signed up for SEI Physics Seminar concurrently. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    SEI PHYSICS SEMINAR

This course is for students in SEI Physics and is connected to the lessons and curriculum of that course. All students enrolled in SEI Physics need to be enrolled in this seminar. Topics covered in course SEI Physics will be extended into seminar with extra emphasis on physics MCAS preparation and support. Students must be signed up for SEI Physics concurrently. (2.5 Credits)

    PHYSICS MCAS SUPPORT

This course is offered two times per week for students that did not pass the Physics STE MCAS in grade 9 and need additional support. Students will review necessary concepts and build skills to help them pass the Physics MCAS. Practice MCAS exams, with an emphasis on open response questions, will be a major part of the preparation process. (2.5 Credits)

    CHEMISTRY I

This course is an introduction to the study of Chemistry. Chemistry I is an inquiry- based course that examines matter and the changes it undergoes. We will cover the essential topics to give you a firm foundation for classes you may take later and for the chemistry you experience in everyday life. The course content may include the study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, reactions, mass relationships in reactions, gasses, liquids, solids, solutions, acids and bases, kinetics and equilibrium, oxidation and reduction, and nuclear chemistry. The course is structured and designed for students with strong interests in math and science. Laboratory experiments will be used to reinforce topics studied in the class. During laboratory experiments students are required to make accurate measurement using a variety of instruments and technologies along with make quantitative and qualitative observation, and use critical thinking skills to solve problems. Students will need to communicate clearly and effectively in verbal and written formats. In addition complete additional research on topics to deepen their knowledge of chemistry. Students will be required to work independently and collaboratively with other students on projects and laboratory experiments. The application of algebra to solve science problems. Students will be constructing and interpreting graphs to solve problems and observe patterns. Students will be performing mathematics to analyze findings and form conclusions from experiments and demonstrations. This course grade will be complied of nightly homework, laboratory reports, test/quizzes, and projects. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Freshman Physics. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    SEI CHEMISTRY

Limited to students enrolled in ESL I or II, this course focuses on the application of various computations in chemistry as well as dimensional analysis. The vocabulary of chemistry continues to be an important focus in order to ensure that students understand essential concepts in Chemistry. Students will explore the system of measurement, matter and energy, atoms and molecules, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical equations, etc. Students will learn about lab safety and how to be productive in the lab. Students are expected to keep an organized notebook, participate actively in class, and complete all assignments. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    BIOLOGY I

This is a first year course in college preparatory biology for the student who has shown deep interest in science, who has demonstrated outstanding ability in previous science courses, and who intends to study advanced placement science courses. Emphasis is on experimental design and application of the scientific process. Topics to be covered include biochemistry, cellular biology, human body systems, genetics, and evolution. This accelerated course uses a molecular approach to biology intended to prepare highly motivated students for a competitive four-year college. It is expected that the honors student: will be able to work independently and collaboratively with other students; will be able to communicate clearly and effectively in verbal and written formats; will use mathematics to analyze findings and form conclusions; and will do additional research to deepen knowledge of biology. Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    SEI BIOLOGY

This course is limited to students enrolled in ESL I or II. This course prepares ESL students for the MCAS exam in biology. Topics to be covered include human body systems, biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, and evolution. Students will be taught to 1) be able to communicate clearly and effectively in verbal and written formats in the science classroom; 2) be productive in laboratory activities; and 3) keep a portfolio of his/her work. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    BIOLOGY MCAS SUPPORT

This course is offered two times per week for students that took Biology but did not pass the Biology Science MCAS. Students will review necessary concepts and build skills. Practice MCAS exams, with an emphasis on open response questions, will be a major part of the preparation process. (2.5 Credits)

    AP PHYSICS 1

This is a college level survey of Algebra-based Physics for students interested in science related careers. The major topics covered are: Mechanics, Rotational Dynamics, Work and Energy, Waves and Sound, and Circuits. There is an emphasis on conceptual understanding, student-driven experimental design, and physical reasoning. Students must also be comfortable with both team and independent work. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Physics examination. Prerequisite: Physics and Geometry. Must be concurrently enrolled or have completed Algebra II Recommended. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    AP PHYSICS 2

This is a college level survey of Algebra-based Physics for students interested in science related careers. The major topics covered are: Electric Fields, Electric Circuits, Magnetism, Thermodynamics, Fluids, Optics, Quantum Physics, Atomic Physics, Nuclear Physics. There is an emphasis on conceptual understanding, student-driven experimental design, and physical reasoning. Students must also be comfortable with both team and independent work. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Physics examination. Prerequisite: AP Physics 1 and Precalculus (may be concurrently enrolled), or Applied Physics Honors or Freshman Conceptual Honors and Precalculus (may be concurrently enrolled). Students enrolling in AP Physics 2 without having completed AP Physics 1, must obtain the recommendation of their Physics teacher. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    AP CHEMISTRY II

This is an intensive course in Chemistry using college level texts and laboratory activities. A wide range of advanced topics will be considered such as: Concepts of matter, thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, etc. The approach will be qualitative and quantitative with an emphasis on lab work. Students are expected to take the AP examination in chemistry. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chemistry and Algebra II, Chemistry teacher recommendation. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    AP BIOLOGY II

This is an intensive survey course in biology using college level texts and laboratory exercises. The successful student is highly motivated, has strong reading comprehension skills, can communicate effectively in writing and is able to maintain a rigorous study schedule. Major topics include cells, biochemistry, biotechnology, biodiversity, genetics, evolution, and human anatomy & physiology. Students are required to complete a summer assignment. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Biology examination. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Chemistry and Honors Biology and Biology teacher recommendation. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (7.5 Credits)

    ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This is a yearlong course that provides students an opportunity to explore the intricate relationship between structure and function in the human body. Students will explore histology and gross human anatomy, in addition to homeostasis and pathophysiology for each body system. Students will also examine case studies, present research projects and participate in laboratory activities and dissections that reinforce concepts presented in the course. Anatomy and Physiology is an excellent introduction for those considering a career in the medical field or for anyone with a general interest in the human body. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    FORENSIC SCIENCE

Students will apply their knowledge of science to solving “crimes” and mysteries of human history. From fingerprinting, to studying DNA evidence, to studying physical evidence, this course brings CSI into the classroom. Students will also be introduced to principles of physics. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

This is a senior elective course that uses the environment as a central theme. In addition to studying fundamental ecological concepts and relationships, students will research and critically examine current environmental concerns and controversies including human population size and its impact on the environment, issues concerning air, water, soil and biological resources, energy use and conservation, land use and waste management, and sustainability practices. Throughout the course, the application of environmental science in students’ lives is explored through lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory activities, field work, and shared research projects and reports. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    AUTHENTIC SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH WITH BRANDEIS SCIENTISTS

This course, in collaboration with Brandeis University, will teach students how to develop and conduct research. This is a unique opportunity to perform real scientific research while in high school. Students will read scientific literature and then propose scientific questions, conduct rigorous experiments and analyze and present their findings alongside Brandeis graduate students. Topics of research will include environmental science, biology, physics and psychology. The class will be project-based and end with a capstone presentation of the students' research. This class is for students interested in science and research and who are curious, motivated and can work independently. Prerequisite: Successful completion of physics, chemistry and biology. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

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This is an introductory biomedical laboratory science course. Students will explore the principles of biomedical science through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine as they explore health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. Students will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional woman as they sequentially piece together evidence found in her medical history and her autopsy report. Students will investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the woman’s life and demonstrate how the development of disease is related to changes in human body systems. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes and allow students to design experiments to solve problems. Key biological concepts including maintenance of homeostasis in the body, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the biomedical sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS

In this laboratory course students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases. Requirements: a passing grade in Principles of Biomedical Sciences and recommendation from Principles of Biomedical Science Teacher. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

This is an introductory engineering design class. Students will dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science and engineering standards to hands-on-projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING DESIGN

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Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. Students explore a broad range of engineering topics including mechanisms, strength of structure and materials, and automation, and then they apply what they know to take on challenges like designing a self-powered car. Requirements: a passing grade in Introduction to Engineering Design and a recommendation from Introduction to Engineering Design Teacher. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT - SCIENCE

Academic Support is an opportunity for students to receive academic tutoring, MCAS support or other science support during the school day. Sections will be staffed with content-certified teachers. Students will participate in Academic Support for limited periods of time throughout the school year as needed to bolster academic performance. (2.5 Credits)

    World Language

Director: Cynthia Piantedosi

Massachusetts Seal of Biliteracy- Any graduating senior who is proficient in English and another language, and meets specific criteria, is eligible to earn this prestigious award. The seal would be displayed on student transcripts and diploma.

The Seal of Biliteracy is an award given in recognition of students who have studied and attained proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing in English and in another language by high school graduation. It promotes biliteracy as an asset and rewards students’ hard work in becoming bilingual and biliterate.

The Seal of Biliteracy provides evidence of skills that are attractive to future employers and college admissions offices.

Please see the Course Selection Book for detailed information on each course offering.

    FRENCH I

This course is designed to enhance students’ ability to learn a foreign language. Students will be expected to use the target language extensively in class to enhance their communicative skills. Students will develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills through oral and written presentations. Short cultural readings will provide authentic insight into French culture worldwide. Students will have the opportunity to work with technology in an interactive manner. In addition to classroom participation, regularly assigned homework, quizzes, and unit tests, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Bon Voyage I. (5 Credits)

    FRENCH II

This course is designed for those students who have successfully completed French I. Honors (200) or have teacher’s recommendation. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills are developed at a rapid pace. Students are expected to master major verb tenses. French is used extensively in class to enhance students’ comprehension and conversational skills and students are expected to respond in French. Students will write short essays in the target language using the acquired vocabulary and grammar structures. Students will have the opportunity to work with technology in an interactive manner. In addition to daily homework, there will be quizzes, unit tests, language and culture projects and role playing in the target language. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Bon Voyage I. Prerequisite: French I. (5 Credits)

    FRENCH III

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed French II. Students are expected to acquire detailed knowledge of all essential elements of language structure and grammar. Conversational proficiency will continue to be emphasized through a variety of activities, including skits, dialogues, presentations and projects. Students’ reading, writing, and listening skills are further developed in the classroom with role playing, outside readings, journal writing, and composition writing. Students are expected to participate in class discussions and respond to daily activities using the target language. Students will continue to enhance their knowledge of culture through selected readings, videos, and songs. Quizzes, unit tests, and cultural projects are utilized to assess students’ performance. Students will have the opportunity to work with technology in an interactive manner. In addition, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final examination will be administered in June. Text: Bon Voyage II. Prerequisite: French II. (5 Credits)

    FRENCH IV

This course is designed for students who demonstrated excellence in French and have completed French III. Class is conducted almost solely in the target language. Students are expected to further enhance their reading ability and cultural awareness through the use of excerpts from authentic literary works as well as other various short stories and websites. Listening and speaking skills are further developed through a variety of audio activities and videos. Students are expected to make presentations and write compositions in the target language. In addition to regularly assigned homework, classroom participation, quizzes and tests will be administered, based on selected readings are required. Students will have the opportunity to work with technology in an interactive manner. In addition, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a final examination is administered in June. Text: Bon Voyage III. Prerequisite: French III. (5 Credits)

    FRENCH V

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The fifth year language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted primarily in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. Prerequisite: French IV. (5 Credits)

    AP FRENCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The fifth year language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted primarily in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. Prerequisite: French IV. This class is only offered exclusively to grade 12 students. (5 Credits)

    ITALIAN I

This course is designed to enhance students’ ability to learn a foreign language. Italian will be widely used in class to enhance students’ communicative skills and to provide a solid base for the acquisition of listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Emphasis will be placed on communicative tasks, language structure, and grammar, practical use of vocabulary, and a true understanding and appreciation of Italian culture. Students are expected to participate in oral discussions, complete daily writing assignments, including interactive online assignments and participate in group activities. Selected readings in the target language will be used regularly during the year to enhance students’ reading and comprehension skills. Cultural understanding will be achieved through authentic videos, music, classroom presentations and multimedia projects. In addition to classroom participation, daily homework, quizzes, and unit tests, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final examination will be administered in June. Text: Sentieri. (5 Credits)

    ITALIAN II

This course is designed for students who have excelled in Italian I. Speaking, listening, reading and writing skills are further developed. Additional grammar elements and verb tenses are introduced at an intensive rate. Students will be expected to formulate complete and logical sentences in speaking and writing, including interactive online assignments. Communicative skills are reinforced through conversational exercises, short oral presentations, role playing and other group activities. Several selected readings will be used to further enhance students’ comprehension skills. Aspects of Italian culture and traditions will be presented in class through videos, music, readings and other sources. In addition to classroom participation, regularly assigned homework, quizzes, and unit tests, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive test will be administered in June. Text: Sentieri. Prerequisite: Italian I. (5 Credits)

    ITALIAN III

This course provides a challenging and rigorous program for students who have successfully completed Italian II. Students will be expected to write coherent, comprehensive paragraphs, to read selected stories and authentic selections of short articles from magazines, newspapers, and various on-line online resources. Students’ communicative skills are continually developed through the use of songs, music, videos, movies and other sources. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and respond to daily activities using the target language. Italian cultural aspects are presented through readings related to the world of art, music, literature and history. In addition to classroom participation, regularly assigned homework, quizzes, and unit tests, a comprehensive final test will be administered in June. Text: Parliamo Italiano/Sentieri. Prerequisite: Italian II. (5 Credits)

    ITALIAN IV

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Italian III. The purpose of this course is to further develop students’ knowledge of Italian language and culture. The course is in part a review of grammar and concepts previously studied. Special importance is given to oral production in class, a deepening of reading comprehension skills and analysis, written work and projects. At the end of the course, students will have increased familiarity with the basic structures of Italian language, a more developed vocabulary, and extensive exposure to social, cultural, literary, and historical themes. In addition to classroom participation, regularly assigned homework, quizzes, and unit tests during the school year, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and the course will conclude with and end of the year assessment. Text: Sentieri Prerequisite: Italian III. (5 Credits)

    ITALIAN V

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The fifth year language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted primarily in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. Prerequisite: Italian IV (5 Credits).

    AP ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The Advanced Placement language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted exclusively in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. The course will emphasize preparation for the AP exam; and students will be expected to take the AP Italian Language exam in May. This class is only offered exclusively to grade 12 students. (5 Credits)

    SPANISH I

This course is designed to enhance students’ ability to learn a foreign language. Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills are developed, through oral presentations, dialogs, as well as reading and writing assignments. Students will learn about the geography and culture of different Hispanic countries through their text and other sources. Students will be expected to respond in Spanish to questions posed by their peers and their teacher, to write conversations and dramatize them. The target culture will be presented in class through videos, music and selected readings from a variety of sources. In addition to classroom participation, daily homework, quizzes and unit tests, a mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final examination will be administered in June. Text: Exprésate I. (5 Credits)

    SPANISH II

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish I. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills will continue to be developed at a rapid and intense rate through oral presentations, readings, writing assignments, and special projects. Students are expected to respond in Spanish to questions posed by their peers and the teacher, to write conversations and dramatize them, and to understand material presented by native speakers on tape. The repertoire of vocabulary and grammar topics is further extended to include additional areas and details. Aspects of Hispanic culture will be presented in class through videos, music, and selected readings from a variety of sources. In addition to regularly assigned homework, there will be weekly quizzes and unit tests on essential elements of language structure and usage. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive exam will be administered in June. Text: Exprésate II. Prerequisite: Spanish I. (5 Credits)

    SPANISH III

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish II. Students are expected to acquire a detailed knowledge of essential elements of language structure and grammar. Students will explore Spanish readings including literary excerpts, short stories, poetry and articles. Conversational proficiency will continue to be emphasized through a variety of activities including skits, dialogues, presentations and projects. Students will continue to develop Spanish writing skills via note taking, journal writing and guided compositions. Appreciation of the rich and varied cultures of the Spanish-speaking world will continue through the use of video clips, cultural and popular music, art and culture-based projects. In addition to regularly assigned homework, a variety of performance assessments will be utilized. These include class participation, projects, tests and quizzes. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive exam will be administered in June. Text: Exprésate III. Prerequisite: Spanish II. (5 Credits)

    SPANISH IV

The three essential components of this course are Spanish language, culture, and literature. This course is designed for the highly motivated language learner. Reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills are enhanced through numerous techniques. Spanish is used exclusively in the classroom. Students continue to practice these skills through projects, presentations debates, and team learning. A goal of this course is to prepare students for future study of Spanish at the university level. Students are expected to actively participate and independently complete regularly assigned work. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and the course will conclude with an end-of-year assessment. Prerequisite: Spanish III. (5 Credits)

    SPANISH V

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The fifth year language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted primarily in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. Prerequisite: Spanish IV. (5 Credits)

    AP SPANISH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

The Advanced Placement language and culture course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the fourth year of language study. It is a course that is conducted exclusively in the target language and offers students an opportunity to review grammatical concepts and enrich vocabulary; while building proficiency in the three modes of communication: Interpretive, Interpersonal, and Presentational. The course is divided into six thematic units which are guided by essential questions and focuses on incorporating cultural elements through authentic materials to each unit of study. The course will emphasize preparation for the AP exam; and students will be expected to take the AP Spanish Language exam in May. This class is only offered exclusively to grade 12 students. (5 Credits)

    LATIN I

This course is designed to enhance students’ ability to learn a foreign language. Students are introduced to grammatical structures and translation of the language. This course also includes a survey of mythology, examination of ancient classical culture, and an emphasis on English-related vocabulary. Students will learn to identify Latin connections of their language while exploring the lives, language and literature of the ancient Romans. Students will strengthen their English grammar and vocabulary skills while learning to translate and make connections between Latin words and their English derivatives. Students are expected to acquire a solid knowledge of all five noun declensions and all four verb conjugations in addition to other grammar topics, mythology and culture. Students will be encouraged to participate in the National Latin Exam, National Myth Exam, National Vocabulary Exam, and their performance will be assessed through a variety of quizzes, unit tests, translation exams, and projects. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Latin for Americans I, Edith Hamilton’s Mythology. (5 Credits)

    LATIN II

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Latin I. Students continue to enhance their vocabulary and translation skills. Students are expected to complete a review of grammatical structures of Latin I and complete all essential Latin grammar. Students will study Roman mythology and history. In addition, they will be encouraged to participate in the National Latin Exam, National Myth Exam, National Vocabulary Exam, and National Etymology Exam. Students’ performance will be assessed through a variety of quizzes, unit tests, translation exams, and projects. A mid-term examination will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Latin for Americans I. Prerequisite: Latin I. (5 Credits)

    LATIN III

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Latin II. Students will be expected to examine the writings and styles of famous authors of Latin prose or poetry. Translation skills and critical analysis are intensively developed throughout the year. Students will be encouraged to write their own Latin poetry modeled by Vergil and Catullus, and devise their own oration based on the works of Cicero. These courses rotate prose one year and poetry the next, and include the study of Roman history and government with a view to a correlative understanding of current events, meter, figures of speech and mythology. Students are encouraged to participate in the National Latin Exam, National Mythology Exam, National Etymology Exam, National Vocabulary Exam, and National Roman Culture Exam. Performance will be assessed with a variety of quizzes, tests, translation exams, and projects. A midterm exam will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Latin for Americans II, and selected readings. Prerequisite: Latin II. (5 Credits)

    LATIN IV

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Latin III. Students will be expected to examine the writings and styles of famous authors of Latin prose or poetry. Translation skills and critical analyses are intensively developed throughout the year. Students will be encouraged to write their own Latin poetry modeled by Vergil and Catullus, and devise their own orations based on the works of Cicero. These courses rotate prose one year and poetry the next, and include the study of Roman history and government with a view to a correlative understanding of current events, meter, figures of speech and mythology. Students are encouraged to participate in the National Latin Exam, National Mythology Exam, National Etymology Exam, National Vocabulary Exam, and National Roman Culture Exam. Performance will be assessed with a variety of quizzes, tests, translation exams, and projects. A midterm exam will be administered in January and a comprehensive final exam will be administered in June. Text: Vergil’s Aeneid and selected readings. Prerequisite: Latin III. (5 Credits)

    AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

This course provides an introduction to American Sign Language. Areas studied include the grammatical structure, usage and history of ASL, as well as finger spelling, ASL classifiers and cultural information related to Deaf Culture and the Deaf Community. Class work and daily homework assignments focus on ASL expressive and receptive skill development, utilizing interactive reinforcement drills, role-plays, videotapes, dialogues, and ASL storytelling. Through hands-on activities, partner and group work, students will learn to develop and enhance their receptive and expressive signing skills. Successful completion of ASL I may be applied toward the Waltham High School and MassCore World Language requirements. (5 Credits)

    AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

This course is a continuation of ASL I focusing on the fundamental elements of American Sign Language in a cultural context. Building on the foundation skills in ASL I, more in depth work will continue on grammatical structures, glossing, and ASL/English translation. Emphasis is placed on the progressive development of expressive and receptive skills. Interactive reinforcement drills, role plays, dialogues, ASL storytelling, student reflections, and video work will continue to be required to improve skills. Also included in the course work will be a deepening in knowledge of Deaf Culture, the Deaf Community, and Deaf History. The goal is for students to be able to comprehend and respond with increasing accuracy to expressive American Sign Language and demonstrate cultural awareness. Successful completion of ASL II may be applied toward the Waltham High School and Mass Core World Language requirements. Prerequisite: ASL I. (5 Credits)
 

Elective Pathways

    Fine and Performing Arts Pathway

    Art

The courses offered by the Art Department are designed to meet the needs of both serious career minded students and any student who desires to enrich his or her life through experiences in the visual arts. Students will gain a solid foundation of pre-professional training through consecutive years of study within these programs.

Students focusing on this pathway must enroll in Art I, Art II or Ceramics, Portfolio Preparation or Advanced Sculpture & Ceramics, AP Drawing Studio or AP 3-D Art & Design, and select two or more additional courses.

    ART I

This two-period class serves as a general introduction to studio art for students of all abilities. Students will explore a variety of media including drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, fiber and sculpture in order to give them a broad basis for personal expression. Students will be introduced to the practice of critique and analyze contemporary and historical artists from diverse cultural backgrounds in regions across the Americas and throughout the world. (2.5 Credits)

    ART II

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Students in Art II will expand their skills in a variety of 2D and 3D media- drawing, painting, mixed-media, printmaking, fiber and sculpture while further developing their individual style and self-expression. Students will hone their skills in the practice of critique and formal analysis and examine contemporary and historical artists from diverse cultural backgrounds in regions across the Americas and around the world. Students will have the opportunity to visit local museums to further their understanding. (5 Credits)

    CERAMICS

This four-block course focuses on the methods and techniques of using clay as a media to create functional and creative works of art. The origins, nature, and qualities of clay will be explored. Craftsmanship, technical proficiency, personal expression and vision will be stressed. Students will problem-solve through the development of a series of works using traditional and non-traditional methods to express themselves through specific themes, concepts, and methods. Prior experience in ceramics is not necessary for success. A sense of adventure is! (5 Credits)

    PORTFOLIO PREPARATION

Portfolio is designed for students who want to concentrate their artistic efforts at a more advanced level and/or intend to further their education at an art school, college or university. Students work in all areas of art with an emphasis on drawing, painting, 2D and 3D design, art history and aesthetics. Students in this class must be willing to put in the extra time and effort to produce the high quality of work expected in an honors-level art course. A sketchbook journal is a requirement for this course as well as an end-of-year art exhibition. (5 Credits)

    ADVANCED SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS

A unique experience of problem solving and creative thinking applied to 3D media is the main focus of this advanced curriculum. Students with an interest in 3-D design will challenge themselves by developing a series of major works related to specific themes, concept, media and methods. Special attention will be paid to craftsmanship, personal vision, and creative expression. Students will take an in-depth look at various materials in order to select those that best express their personal statement in order to create 3D art of portfolio quality. Prerequisite: Sculpture OR Ceramics (5 Credits)

    AP DRAWING STUDIO

Advanced Placement Studio Drawing is for highly motivated students and involves a significant level of commitment and work outside of school. This course is designed for students who wish to develop mastery in the concept, composition, and execution of their ideas and will address two major concerns: 1) a sense of quality in a student's work; 2) a sustained investigation of a particular theme or concept. Upon completing AP Studio Art, students will submit a portfolio to the College Board for college credit. A sketchbook journal is a requirement for this course as well as an end-of-year art exhibition. (5 Credits)

    AP 3-D ART & DESIGN

Departmental approval is required for this rigorous course for the highly motivated artistically gifted student who intends to pursue a career in the visual arts. Participants will create work which meet the requirements of the College Board Advanced Placement Studio 3D Design guidelines. Students will submit works of art, digital images and reflective documentational writings & drawings, that support their inquiry-guided investigation through practice, experimentation, & revision. In the Selected Works section special attention is paid to materials, process, and ideas used. Prerequisite: Two years of a 5-credit studio class including one year in Advanced Sculpture and or AP Drawing Portfolio. (5 Credits)

    GLASS

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Create 2 & 3D handcrafted designs of light, color, line, and texture. Students will safely learn to cut, grind and solder stained glass, and integrate with other non-porous materials, to create unique works of art. Employing the Tiffany Method through a series of assignments, students will use their creativity and insights to create various striking works of glass in combination with compatible materials. (2.5 Credits)

    SCULPTURE

This class offers an introductory exploration of sculpture, hand built ceramics and 3D design. Materials that will be used will be paper, wood, clay, plaster and wire. Students will learn basic tools and techniques required for 3D work. Craftsmanship, personal vision, creative expression & reflection will be of primary concern. Cultural, historical and contemporary art concepts will also be explored. No prior art experience is necessary. (2.5 Credits)

    PHOTO I

In this course we will explore how and why photographers create work and the basics of taking a successful photograph. This class will include students taking their own original photographs, learning multiple techniques on Photoshop, and analyzing and discussing historic and contemporary photographers. Use of your smart phone or personal camera is encouraged. Point-and-shoot cameras are available to all students in the course. (2.5 Credits)

    AP PHOTOGRAPHY

This course is designed for highly motivated students interested in continuing their exploration of photography. In this course we will take a deeper look into the work of past and contemporary photographers and explore career options within the fine art and commercial photography fields. Students will continue learning more advanced editing techniques in Photoshop and be pushed to create work that is personally significant and reflective of their interests. Students should be aware that AP work involves significantly more commitment and accomplishment than the typical high school course. AP students will submit a portfolio of work to the College Board at the end of the year for college credit. Prerequisite: Photo I, Photo II and/or teacher approval. (5 Credits)

    Drama and Dance

The Drama Department provides opportunities in the two allied arts: Theatre, and Dance. Students of all experience levels are encouraged to participate, especially if interested in the extracurricular Plays, Musicals and Dance Theatre. These classes are directly aligned with the skills needed to excel for mainstage performance. Students will gain a solid foundation of pre-professional training through consecutive years of study within these programs.

    Drama

Students focusing on this pathway must enroll in Intro to Theatre and Dance, Acting I, Acting II, Advanced Acting Honors, and select two or more additional courses.

    INTRO TO THEATRE AND DANCE

This class explores the many areas of the theatre and dance world. Students will be introduced to improvisation, acting, movement and choreography, technical theater and film work. A true sampling of the many other theatre and dance courses you can advance to at WHS! No prior performance experience needed. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING I

This course focuses on the building blocks of acting and public speaking. Through a variety of professional and student written scripts, we will focus on creative drama, communication, movement, theatre games, improvisations, voice and speech, scene work and musical theatre. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING II

This intermediate course is designed to build on the acting skills introduced in Acting I. More advanced scene work, character study, self-scripting and playwriting will take the student’s acting to the next level. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED ACTING HONORS

This course is designed for students who are serious about acting and theatrical performance. We will cover in depth acting techniques and methods, monologue work, musical theatre, Shakespeare, stage combat among other subjects. Students will also have the opportunity to perform in a one act play. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for larger roles in our extracurricular plays and musicals. Can be taken as a 2 or a 4 period class. Prerequisite: Acting I, Acting II or Instructor's Approval. (5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT I

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This course offers an exciting study of physical stage and body movement for both the performing and non-performing student. Learning to relax and feel comfortable with one’s body, in front of others, is essential for all students. Choreography, construction, and quality of movement are covered. Some detail is spent on different styles of movement, dance, mime, musical theatre and various ethnic styles. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit.. Students will be invited to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. (2.5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT II

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This course is an advanced version of Stage and Body Movement I. It gives the student an opportunity to expand upon technique, skills and concepts introduced in Level I. Independent choreography and performance are stressed. Students electing Stage and Body Movement II are required to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit or may also participate in two sections simultaneously. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT INTENSIVE HONORS

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This course is designed for students who are serious about dance and theatrical performance. A majority of the class will be spent on classical dance technique, vocabulary and cover lyrical, contemporary, tap, ballet and jazz genres of dance. Time will also be spent on technical & theatrical aspects of performance in depth theories of movement, cross curricular connections and independent choreography. There is an expectation that all students will perform in this class throughout the year. This Intensive course will be averaged into the student’s GPA at Honors Level. Prerequisite: Stage & Body Movement I, II & Audition or Instructor's Approval (5 Credits)

    STAGECRAFT AND DESIGN

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This class is for the student who is interested in a behind the scenes look at the world of theatre. This class will offer a hands on approach to scenic design and stagecraft as the students become a part of the design and construction team of all the major stage productions at the high school. The class will focus on the different facets of design including lighting, costume, sound, special effect make-up, and scenery. (2.5 Credits)

    Dance

Students focusing on this pathway must enroll in Stagecraft & Design, Stage & Body Movement I, Stage & Body Movement II, Stage & Body Intensive Honors, and select two or more additional courses.

    STAGECRAFT AND DESIGN

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This class is for the student who is interested in a behind the scenes look at the world of theatre. This class will offer a hands on approach to scenic design and stagecraft as the students become a part of the design and construction team of all the major stage productions at the high school. The class will focus on the different facets of design including lighting, costume, sound, special effect make-up, and scenery. (2.5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT I

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This course offers an exciting study of physical stage and body movement for both the performing and non-performing student. Learning to relax and feel comfortable with one’s body, in front of others, is essential for all students. Choreography, construction, and quality of movement are covered. Some detail is spent on different styles of movement, dance, mime, musical theatre and various ethnic styles. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit.. Students will be invited to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. (2.5 Credits)

    STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT II

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This course is an advanced version of Stage and Body Movement I. It gives the student an opportunity to expand upon technique, skills and concepts introduced in Level I. Independent choreography and performance are stressed. Students electing Stage and Body Movement II are required to participate in one evening performance at the end of the school year. Students may repeat this course and will continue to receive credit or may also participate in two sections simultaneously. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED STAGE AND BODY MOVEMENT INTENSIVE HONORS

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This course is designed for students who are serious about dance and theatrical performance. A majority of the class will be spent on classical dance technique, vocabulary and cover lyrical, contemporary, tap, ballet and jazz genres of dance. Time will also be spent on technical & theatrical aspects of performance in depth theories of movement, cross curricular connections and independent choreography. There is an expectation that all students will perform in this class throughout the year. This Intensive course will be averaged into the student’s GPA at Honors Level. Prerequisite: Stage & Body Movement I, II & Audition or Instructor's Approval (5 Credits)

    INTRO TO THEATRE AND DANCE

This class explores the many areas of the theatre and dance world. Students will be introduced to improvisation, acting, movement and choreography, technical theater and film work. A true sampling of the many other theatre and dance courses you can advance to at WHS! No prior performance experience needed. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING I

This course focuses on the building blocks of acting and public speaking. Through a variety of professional and student written scripts, we will focus on creative drama, communication, movement, theatre games, improvisations, voice and speech, scene work and musical theatre. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING II

This intermediate course is designed to build on the acting skills introduced in Acting I. More advanced scene work, character study, self-scripting and playwriting will take the student’s acting to the next level. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED ACTING HONORS

This course is designed for students who are serious about acting and theatrical performance. We will cover in depth acting techniques and methods, monologue work, musical theatre, Shakespeare, stage combat among other subjects. Students will also have the opportunity to perform in a one act play. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for larger roles in our extracurricular plays and musicals. Can be taken as a 2 or a 4 period class. Prerequisite: Acting I, Acting II or Instructor's Approval. (5 Credits)

    Music

The music program at Waltham High School is designed to give students the necessary skills needed to understand, appreciate, and perform music in college, community ensembles or as professional musicians. All Musical Ensembles, Instrumental and Choral meets four periods per week at Grade 9.10,11 and 12. Because of the difficulty of the literature and the high level of performance, juniors and seniors are not allowed to take these courses for two blocks. Freshman Chorus and Latinx Choir are an exception as they only meet two times per week. Students will gain a solid foundation of pre-professional training through consecutive years of study within these programs.

Students focusing on this pathway must enroll in four years of a musical ensemble and select two or more additional courses.

    WIND ENSEMBLE HONORS

Wind Ensemble is open to any student with previous experience playing a band instrument. Students who are members of Wind Ensemble will perform at all home football games, at the Holiday Festival of the Arts, Student Santa, winter, spring and All City Concerts, and at graduation. Each performance counts as 10% of the quarter grade. Some Wind Ensemble members will also play with the Symphony Orchestra and may be required to attend after-school rehearsals with the string players. (Usually two per concert) Additional opportunities exist for an out of state trip (such as Walt Disney World) for band members in good standing. Students will play music in a wide range of musical styles, and experience the cooperative skills needed to perform in an ensemble. (5 Credits)

    STRING ORCHESTRA HONORS

String Orchestra is open to any student with previous experience playing an orchestral string instrument. Students who are members of String Orchestra will perform at the Holiday Festival of the Arts, Student Santa, winter, spring and All City Concerts. Some String Orchestra members will also play for special events in the greater Waltham area. Orchestra students may be required to attend after-school rehearsal when playing Symphony Orchestra music with winds and percussion (usually two per concert). Additional opportunities exist for an out of state trip (such as Walt Disney World) for string members in good standing. Students will play music in a wide range of musical styles, using complex rhythms, in a variety of keys, using advanced techniques, and experience the cooperative skills needed to perform in an ensemble. (5 Credits)

    MIXED CHOIR HONORS

Mixed Choir is a group of singers who work on a wide range of vocal styles from Classical to modern pop and musical theater. This course focuses on building vocal technique, sight singing, and music theory skills. This group appears at several performances throughout the school year. (5 Credits)

    LATINX CHOIR HONORS

Latinx Choir will perform, analyze and celebrate music from a variety of Latin cultures. We will sing music from some of the top Latin singers such as Selena, Romeo Santos, Celia Cruz, Shakira and more! This is a place where students will come together to make music based around the Latin culture and Spanish language. This group appears at several performances throughout the school year. (5 Credits)

    MUSIC UNLIMITED

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Music Unlimited is a select group of singers and dancers who perform a wide range of vocal styles from classical concert literature to popular and show choir music. Placement in this ensemble is based upon a vocal and choreography audition. This course is co-curricular and functions as both a concert choir and extra-curricular competitive show choir. This group typically rehearses Tuesdays and Thursdays, and attends competitions. Students will sing music in four or more parts from various styles and cultures. Attendance at school performances, community events, and show choir competitions is mandatory. (5 Credits)

    MUSIC EXPRESS HONORS

Music Express is a select group of singers for a non-competitive treble show choir made up of students in grades 9 - 12. Music Express performs standard choral music along with contemporary pop music such as Beyonce, Andra Day, Meghan Trainor, Bruno Mars and Pentatonix. Placement in this ensemble is based upon a vocal and choreography audition. Course expectations are to increase students’ vocal technique, sight singing, choreography, stage presence, and performance skills. Music Express performs at several concerts throughout the year. (5 Credits)

    HONORS GUITAR ENSEMBLE

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Honors Guitar Ensemble is a four-period class that is designed to offer an extension of the two-period Guitar Ensemble Class. Students electing to take the Honors level will be responsible for meeting all the requirements of Guitar Ensemble. Additionally, Honors candidates will study scales, modes, chord voicings, theory, ear training, improvisational techniques in a variety of styles and advanced rhythms in greater depth as it relates to improvising, composition, note reading and repertoire. Class participation and presentations are a significant aspect of this course. Honors Guitar Ensemble may be repeated each year for credit. (5 Credits)

    MUSIC THEORY

Students taking this course are expected to learn basic concepts of music reading and writing, and apply these concepts using available music technology. Students will learn to read pitch notation on the treble and bass clef staves, and learn scales, keys, intervals, and chords as the building blocks of harmony. They will become fluent in rhythm reading in common time signatures, and learn to identify rhythm and pitch structures by ear. Students who are already advanced in this regard can enroll in AP Music Theory without taking Theory I. (2.5 Credits)

    BEGINNING PIANO CLASS

This class is open to all students who wish to learn to play the piano. It is intended for students with little or no prior piano experience. Students will learn to read treble and bass clef, play with both hands, and play multiple keys and positions. Students may be asked to improvise or compose a song with a melody line and chords. Periodic worksheets and assessments will be given to strengthen understanding of musical concepts. (2.5 Credits)

    AP MUSIC THEORY

This course is designed for those students who have a serious interest in music as a career and who plan to elect music as a major or minor beyond high school. It is strongly recommended that students have completed at least two years in a performance group, have a solid background in music theory and can display competence on a principal instrument. Theory Exam in the spring. Course content will focus on advanced concepts in Music Theory; including four part harmonization using principles of 18th century voice leading, harmonic analysis including secondary dominants and modulations, advanced sight-reading in major and minor modes, composition of a bass line and melodic dictation. Advanced projects in performance and composition will also be components of this course. Along with planned instructional activities, much of the course work will involve directed study, independent performance, music analysis, and utilization of music technology. It is expected that all students enrolled will take the Advanced Placement Exam. (5 Credits)

    ROCK MUSIC - THE FIFTIES TO PRESENT DAY

Students in this course will explore the many facets of Rock music from its early roots, beginning in the fifties , through the present day. In additional to studying the different genres of Rock music, we will discuss the political, social and economic events which influenced its development. Artists particularly important to each genre will be studied in depth to include the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, David Bowie and other artists from the second half of the 20th Century. We will also learn how to analyze instrumentation, structure and lyrics of Rock music. This unit-based course requires no previous musical experience and fulfills the required Fine Arts credited needed for graduation. (2.5 Credits)

    SONGWRITING

This course will develop the necessary skills that will enable students to create musical compositions. Students will study various aspects of melody, rhythm, harmony, lyrics and how it relates to writing songs. This course will be personalized allowing students to choose the style/s they wish to compose in such as rock, rap, jazz, and other genres. To facilitate this course, music software programs will be utilized. Prerequisites: Students should have some prior experience in other music courses, i.e.) theory, guitar, keyboard, band, orchestra, or one of our choral programs. They should already be familiar with basic note reading. (2.5 Credits)

    MUSIC AND SOCIETY: FROM ROCK TO RAP AND HIP HOP

This course will answer the phrase “How can music reflect, anticipate and challenge society?” In doing so, we will explore musical examples of various decades from the 20th and 21 centuries. From the jazz era through rap and hip hop students will discover the ways that music not only documents human events, but in many cases actually influences the direction and evolution of individual and societal thought and action. This course will allow students to analyze lyrics for meaning in context of the era they were written while making connections to events and attitudes of current times exploring the relation between music, history and sociology. We achieve this by matching various songs and stylistic musical expressions with surrounding cultural events showing how the thoughts, attitudes and actions of society are represented through music. Students will produce a variety of small Project-Based Learning assignments culminating in a final presentation. (2.5 Credits)

    INTRODUCTION TO SOUND RECORDING

This course will introduce students to the technology used in creating professional quality audio recordings. Students will be expected to use MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) applications, microphones, microphone technique, signal processing, stereo imaging, mixing, and multi-tracking in both the analog and digital realms. To demonstrate understanding of all of these areas, students will be expected to participate in the production of a number of recordings. This course is limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors who study instruments or singing. (2.5 Credits)

    BEGINNING GUITAR

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This course is for students who wish to begin the study of guitar. Students will learn to play open position major, minor, and dominant chord progressions, recognize note values and associated rhythms, read and play melodies in open finger position, have small group performances in the blues, classical and pop/rock styles and develop improvisational and compositional techniques utilizing the 12 bar blues structure. All of the above will be assessed through in-class performance and recitals. A limited number of school guitars will be available and assigned to students at the discretion of the teacher. (2.5 Credits)

    JAZZ BAND

In addition to the skills demonstrated in Wind Ensemble/Concert Band, Jazz Band students will be expected to become familiar with various jazz idioms from blues to big band to rock/fusion. They must demonstrate improvisational skills in class and during all in-school and evening performances. Performances at school programs and evening concerts will account for 10% of the grade. Concurrent enrollment in Wind Ensemble or Concert Band is required. (2.5 Credits)

    VOICE TRAINING

This course is designed for students who would like to further develop their solo singing voices. Class material will be focused around solo singing including topics such as: vocal production, breathing techniques, and expanding vocal ranges. Voice Training incorporates listening to and analyzing singers of all styles, along with preparing songs of all styles with a solo mindset. (2.5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 TV Broadcasting

As a member of the TV Broadcasting team, students will learn how to operate professional camera equipment, set up shots/locations, record and edit videos, write scripts, produce music videos, news reports, sporting events, and more. Students will work on in house assignments as well as production work for the schools, community, and local businesses. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and tools, and work in a large, well-ventilated shop area as well as opportunities to move throughout the school to capture events on film.

    TV BROADCASTING 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including learning the basics of creating programming using television, camera, computer and multimedia equipment and program & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at preproduction scripting and storyboarding as well as production and postproduction editing practices. They will look to become proficient at understanding the writing and technical skills required for quality video production. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the TV Broadcasting program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Camera Operator, TV Producer, or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of “real world” roles of writers, producers, directors, actors, camerapersons, technical and audio directors, and editors. Students in this program will apply organizational production skills to produce a weekly newscast among many other projects throughout the year. Projects will demonstrate effective pre-production, production, and post-production using best practices all while reinforcing the fundamentals of digital video and broadcast journalism. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course. Students will be required to produce the daily news show “Hawks Eye View” to be shown in first period class each day. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course that requires planning, producing, and overall teamwork. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 2 course. Students will be exposed to advanced concepts in Television Production. Students enrolled in this class will be responsible for a wide variety of projects that will solidify their skills. This class covers single camera film style production. This class meets concurrently with the Television Broadcasting II so these students will serve as mentors for the TV II students. Students will direct live studio productions as well as direct and produce ENG and EFP productions. Students in this class should expect a large amount of extra-curricular production work, as they will be involved in creating their own production company and videotaping sports and school events as part of their curriculum. Students completing this course will have gained the skills and knowledge needed to advance into a college level program or seek gainful employment in a rapidly growing field. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Carpentry

As a member of the Carpentry team, students will learn about construction and manufacturing techniques. Carpenters are employed in almost every type of construction activity and are the largest group of building trade workers in the country. There is a greater demand for qualified technicians than there are trained people to fill open positions, ensuring job security upon graduation. Students will learn about the planning and constructing of wood projects, furniture, cabinetry and buildings/construction. They will learn about OSHA safety regulations on the jobsite and have the opportunity to become OSHA-10 safety certified in their junior year. Students will learn the safe and effective use of hand and power tools that are utilized in rough carpentry and fine finish work. Blueprint reading, estimation of cost, shell construction, and renovation are part of the curriculum. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge.

    CARPENTRY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including an overview and use of shop equipment like the band saw, sander, and drill press, measuring/reading a tape measure, and hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at architectural drawings/blueprints, basic construction techniques like framing for ceilings/walls/floors, and basic cabinet making skills like joining. New equipment to be introduced is the table saw, cross cut saw, rip saw, dado and rabbet saws. Sample projects include a bench and chest. They will look to become proficient at safety standards. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Carpentry program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on real construction projects around the school building as available. (10 Credits)

    CARPENTRY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Carpenter or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of construction techniques including stair construction, drywall, plaster, tile, and roof construction. Students will be introduced to ‘green’ products like insulation, windows and doors. Activities will include building a coffee table, encompassing inlay techniques, learning more about types of wood and their properties, and learning new shop equipment like the router table. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    CARPENTRY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Carpentry 2 course. Students will work on developing skills in drawer construction including raised and flat panel with the construction of a nightstand. The course continues to focus on construction techniques and safety standards on the jobsite. A large focus is on entrepreneurial skills needed when running a business including withholdings, writing checks, balancing books, and job estimating. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. Prerequisite – A passing grade in Carpentry 2, and meeting attendance, discipline/conduct record, and safety requirements. (17.5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Collision Technology

As a member of the Collision Technology team, students will learn how to diagnosis & estimate damages, work with customers and insurance companies, and ultimately repair automobiles that have sustained damage from an accident. They will learn about the many systems within a car and apply that knowledge in a practical, hands-on shop setting. Students will work on ‘practice’ cars as well as customer’s vehicles. From hot rods to classic antiques and custom fabrication, to repairing late model car wrecks, this industry is both exciting and challenging. We encourage any student with an interest in fine details and craftsmanship to join our team! All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and tools, and work in a large, well-ventilated shop area.

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Collision Technology Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including vehicle safety inspections, detailing, identifying vehicle components, light cosmetic repairs, and hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at vehicle structures and identifying when to repair vs replace vehicle components. They will look to become proficient at preparing new and used panels, masking vehicles for paint, and final car detailing. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Collision program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on ‘live’ cars including practice vehicles and actual customer’s cars. (5 Credits)

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Collision 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Automotive Collision Technician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of non-structural vehicle repairs. Activities will include dent repair, water leaks, glass removal/repair, welding technology, plastic repair, panel replacement/alignment and basic refinishing. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    COLLISION TECHNOLOGY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Collision 2 course. Students will work on developing skills in vehicle estimating, understanding vehicle insurance policies, basic structural analysis and repair, and advanced refinishing technology. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Health and Wellness Pathway

    Health and Wellness

This pathway is ideal for you if you are interested in exploring a variety of health and wellness courses and are interested in helping people improve and maintain their health and well-being. This pathway will allow you to explore many areas of health and wellness including nutrition, fitness, stress management, and the human body. If you are interested in working in health care setting, running an employee wellness program or teaching clients about nutrition and exercise this is the pathway for you.

    HONORS HEALTH SCIENCE

This is a course for the honors student who plans to pursue or who is interested in a career in any of the allied health professions. Students will gain an understanding of the human body as it relates to the causes, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Students will learn about various allied health careers and relevant medical terminology for these careers. Other topics include human development, bioethics, food policy, and reproductive health. This class will include labs such as taking blood pressures, EKG’s, vital signs, lung auscultation, cardiovascular labs and monitoring oxygen saturation. . Honors Health Science may be taken concurrently with another science course. This course fulfills a unit of “Additional Core Courses" for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    CURRENT HEALTH

This is a course about you and how the quality of your life is affected by smoking, drugs, alcohol, sleep, nutrition, fitness, stress management, and other lifestyle choices. The life cycle is explored from conception to birth including parenting. Other topics include the body systems, reproductive health, genetic diseases, decision-making, goal setting, and relationships. Students will explore current issues and trends in health through online, newspaper, and magazine sources. This course will help you deepen your awareness of the above topics and give you the tools you need to live your healthiest life. This course fulfills a unit of “Additional Core Courses" for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    STRESS MANAGEMENT/VIOLENCE PREVENTION

The first half of the year, students will examine the effects of stress on the body and mind, as well as the impact stress has on one’s health, wellness, and quality of life. Students will learn how to recognize stress as well as effective strategies for managing and coping with the stressors in their daily life. In addition, students will increase their concentration and focus and create a healthy life balance that will allow them to reduce stress and increase productivity.

The second half of the year, the course will shift to Violence Prevention: Hawk Strong where students will examine a variety of issues including bullying, harassment, dating violence, sexual assault, and the impact of the media in society. Students will explore the sources of violence in school and society and will develop skills to prevent and combat violent situations acquiring effective conflict resolution skills to foster personal growth. Particular attention will be paid to dating violence and the importance of developing healthy relationships. (2.5 Credits)

    NUTRITION, FOOD, AND FITNESS

This class looks into proper nutrition for anyone who wants to be at their best. The course will cover the major components of good nutrition for men and women and the development of lifelong healthy eating habits. The topics in this class include: eating for success, proper hydration and fluid replacement, supplements, vitamins and minerals, metabolism, anaerobic vs. aerobic exercise, injuries resulting from poor nutrition, the proper amount of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in the diet, and eating disorders. (2.5 Credits)

    ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

This is a yearlong course that provides students an opportunity to explore the intricate relationship between structure and function in the human body. Students will explore histology and gross human anatomy, in addition to homeostasis and pathophysiology for each body system. Students will also examine case studies, present research projects and participate in laboratory activities and dissections that reinforce concepts presented in the course. Anatomy and Physiology is an excellent introduction for those considering a career in the medical field or for anyone with a general interest in the human body. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    BUILDING LEADERSHIP PRINCIPLES THROUGH FITNESS

This course is a combination of classroom and fitness activities that will help students develop and explore leadership principles. The connection between fitness and leadership goes back thousands of years to when “fit to lead” literally meant that a person was physically fit enough to lead a community. Students will be challenged both mentally and physically as they explore the connection between physical exercise and leadership skill building. The primary objectives of this course would be:

  • Self Awareness (What is the student’s True North)
  • Developing Core Values
  • Discipline
  • Staying Positive, Sharing a Vision, and Working Together
  • Service Leadership and other Leadership Models
Students who have an interest in being a leader may have a particular interest in this course. This course is designed to take a student out of their comfort zone and push them to improve mentally and physically. This course requires the approval of a HS teacher, club advisor, or a coach. (2.5 Credits)

    PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This is an introductory biomedical laboratory science course. Students will explore the principles of biomedical science through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine as they explore health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. Students will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional woman as they sequentially piece together evidence found in her medical history and her autopsy report. Students will investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the woman’s life and demonstrate how the development of disease is related to changes in human body systems. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes and allow students to design experiments to solve problems. Key biological concepts including maintenance of homeostasis in the body, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the biomedical sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Health Assisting

Health Occupations are one of the fastest growing industries in the US with a high demand for multi-skilled healthcare workers. To meet this challenge, students in the Health Assistant program study the therapeutic, diagnostic and administrative areas of the health professions with an emphasis on the Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA) certification. Students are given theoretical and practical instruction in the laboratory and clinical experience in area healthcare facilities as they progress through the program. Medical related sciences are integrated into the Health Assistant curriculum. These include anatomy and physiology, nutrition and biology. Medical Terminology, Introduction to Electrocardiography, Introduction to Phlebotomy and a thirty hour Home Care Aide course are taught during the student’s Health Assisting high school career. Students are prepared to test for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health certification exam for Nurse Assistants. Many Health Assistant students pursue post secondary education to continue their education in Nursing, Allied Health, or other medical related careers.

    HEALTH ASSISTING 1 *anticipated

Health Assisting 1 will begin by offering students an overview of healthcare professions and the various occupations available in the field. The goal is to have an introductory knowledge and pre-care skills necessary to continue in the Nurse Aide curriculum. Students are introduced to the language of medicine and medical terminology, and begin studying the basic structure of the human body. The Health Assisting curriculum also includes an introduction to nutrition & introduction to geriatrics and understanding dementia. The students are taught CPR, first aid, infection control and basic anatomy and physiology. Additionally students study the structure and function of the human body, medical abbreviations, medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes. Students are taught the anatomy and physiology, diagnostic, therapeutic and pathology terms of the special senses, reproductive and integumentary systems. (5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Culinary Arts

As a member of the Culinary Arts team, students will learn all aspects of working in the foodservice industry. They will learn about the many positions needed to run a successful restaurant, bake shop or catering company, and apply that knowledge in a practical, hands-on shop setting. Students will produce and serve food for our in-house teachers restaurant, Watch City Cafe. They will also be responsible for serving food, beverages, and desserts for a number of school sponsored events. All classes emphasize safety and sanitation standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and kitchen tools.

    CULINARY ARTS 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Culinary Arts Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including kitchen safety, proper food handling practices and sanitation, knife skills, beginning stages of food preparation as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at the strands of the culinary arts curriculum. In addition to menu planning, ordering, basic nutrition, and preparation of all food. Culinary students will gain experience in a student managed restaurant, and catering business. ServeSafe/ safety regulations and safety standards within the Culinary Arts program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    CULINARY ARTS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Culinary Arts 1 course. They will continue to expand their knowledge of kitchen safety, knife safety and begin exploring menu planning, nutrition, and complex multistage recipes. Students will have the opportunity to obtain their ServeSafe certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    CULINARY ARTS 3

This course building upon the skills learned in Culinary 1 & 2. It will focus on restaurant and catering production, menu planning, and the front of the house services aspects of the industry. (15 Credits)

    Humanities Pathway

    Journalism

This pathway is ideal for you if you enjoy writing and are interested in journalism or communications as a career. The courses in this pathway will hone your skills in many modes of communication through writing, political dialogue, public performance, and visual arts. If you are interested in writing for a newspaper or magazine, or working in public relations, marketing, TV broadcasting, or politics, this pathway offers a solid foundation of the communication skills you’ll need to be successful in these fields.

Students focusing on this pathway must enroll in Journalism and select two additional courses.

    JOURNALISM

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This course introduces students to the exciting world of print and online media. They study the basic principles of print and online journalism, as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students conduct interviews, research, write, and design their own online publication, The Talon Tribune. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING I

This course focuses on the building blocks of acting and public speaking. Through a variety of professional and student written scripts, we will focus on creative drama, communication, movement, theatre games, improvisations, voice and speech, scene work and musical theatre. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ACTING II

This intermediate course is designed to build on the acting skills introduced in Acting I (course #579). More advanced scene work, character study, self-scripting and playwriting will take the student’s acting to the next level. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for our extracurricular plays and musicals. (2.5 Credits)

    ADVANCED ACTING HONORS

This course is designed for students who are serious about acting and theatrical performance. We will cover in depth acting techniques and methods, monologue work, musical theatre, Shakespeare, stage combat among other subjects. Students will also have the opportunity to perform in a one act play. This course is directly aligned with the skills needed for larger roles in our extracurricular plays and musicals. (5 Credits)

    CURRENT ISSUES A & B

These student-driven courses will examine events happening now that will affect our lives in the future. It will evaluate the impact news coverage and reporting have on our understanding of current world history. What sort of stories make it into the news and why? Who decides which stories are reported and from what angle? Students will investigate how events are reported, compare different media reports of the same event and analyze the consequences of instant reporting of events through various media outlets. Comparisons will also be made between recent news reports and similar past events. Students will be required to read and watch daily reports while comparing and reacting to their content and point of view. Students will be asked to complete several critical analysis projects and assignments, culminating with a final point of view project at the end of the academic year. (2.5 Credits)

    AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION

This course demands a student’s commitment and ability to sustain a high level of academic rigor in reading and writing. Students will read for depth and breadth from a primary text, The Language of Composition, and learn about rhetorical form from a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts in order to develop skilled writing. Authors include Huxley, Plato, Machiavelli, Capote, Fitzgerald, and O’Brien along with a variety of other nonfiction sources selected for the quality of their writing: rhetoric, argument, and analysis. Each quarter will involve work pertaining to skills that prepare students for the A.P. Language and Composition exam, and all students are expected to take the A.P. Language and Composition test in May. Students must be recommended by their sophomore English teacher and gain approval before enrolling in this course. Summer reading will be addressed at the beginning of the first quarter through exams, essays, and discussions, and will be referred to throughout the year. This course meets the recommendation for an English class as outlined in MassCore. (5 Credits)

    PHOTO I

In this course we will explore how and why photographers create work and the basics of taking a successful photograph. This class will include students taking their own original photographs, learning multiple techniques on Photoshop, and analyzing and discussing historic and contemporary photographers. Use of your smart phone or personal camera is encouraged. Point-and-shoot cameras are available to all students in the course. (2.5 Credits)

    PHOTO II

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

Photo II is designed for students who want to continue their exploration of photography. This course will include taking original photographs, more advanced Photoshop techniques, and engaging in deeper analysis and discussion of historic and contemporary photographers. Students will explore a variety of styles of photography and begin developing their own personal voice as an artist. Students will have the opportunity to visit local museums and galleries to further expand their understanding. Use of smartphones or personal cameras is encouraged. Point-and-shoot cameras are available to all students in the course. This art course requires weekly homework. (5 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including learning the basics of creating programming using television, camera, computer and multimedia equipment and program & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at preproduction scripting and storyboarding as well as production and postproduction editing practices. They will look to become proficient at understanding the writing and technical skills required for quality video production. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the TV Broadcasting program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Camera Operator, TV Producer, or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of “real world” roles of writers, producers, directors, actors, camerapersons, technical and audio directors, and editors. Students in this program will apply organizational production skills to produce a weekly newscast among many other projects throughout the year. Projects will demonstrate effective pre-production, production, and post-production using best practices all while reinforcing the fundamentals of digital video and broadcast journalism. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course. Students will be required to produce the daily news show “Hawks Eye View” to be shown in first period class each day. This is a very fast paced deadline oriented course that requires planning, producing, and overall teamwork. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    TV BROADCASTING 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the TV Broadcasting 2 course. Students will be exposed to advanced concepts in Television Production. Students enrolled in this class will be responsible for a wide variety of projects that will solidify their skills. This class covers single camera film style production. This class meets concurrently with the Television Broadcasting II so these students will serve as mentors for the TV II students. Students will direct live studio productions as well as direct and produce ENG and EFP productions. Students in this class should expect a large amount of extra-curricular production work, as they will be involved in creating their own production company and videotaping sports and school events as part of their curriculum. Students completing this course will have gained the skills and knowledge needed to advance into a college level program or seek gainful employment in a rapidly growing field. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    Law and Government

Have you ever thought of pursuing a career as a lawyer? Perhaps you’ve thought of becoming a police officer or getting into law enforcement? Maybe you’ve thought about public service or a career in politics? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, or even if you’re just interested in the law and how it works, then the Law and Government pathway is for you! You do not have to follow a prescribed sequence of courses in this pathway - instead, you have the freedom to choose from this great set of engaging elective courses.

    CIVICS - GOVERNMENT, AND CITIZENSHIP IN THE 21ST CENTURY

This course will begin with an examination of the foundations of American government but through readings, discussion, film, and research, students will explore how our system of government has changed over time. The structure and function of the government will be analyzed on a national, state, and local level while showing how each level is interrelated. Students will examine how the concept of civic participation has evolved and will investigate the rights and responsibilities of citizens in our modern world. Throughout the course we will focus on how citizens can play an active role in our government and show how individuals, through civic participation, can shape our society. (5 Credits)

    CONSTITUTIONAL & CRIMINAL LAW

This course is a detailed and rigorous examination of the Massachusetts criminal justice system, as well as an in-depth analysis of individual civil liberties and their basis in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Landmark American trials, key constitutional cases, and current legal issues are extensively reviewed. Current criminology theories will be examined and researched. Students will be asked to complete research papers, prepare legal briefs, participate in mock trials, read Truman Capote’s classic non-fiction work, In Cold Blood, and Lara Bricker’s book Lie after Lie, describing the successful investigation by the Waltham Police Department in the recent “anti-freeze” murder case. Students will view trials in Suffolk Superior Court and interview a Superior court judge. The course features guest lectures by Waltham police officers, state police officials, district attorneys and defense lawyers. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered. (5 Credits)

    AP UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

This course will provide students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. government and politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. government and politics. Students successfully completing this course will be expected to learn important facts, concepts, and theories pertaining to U.S. government; understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences; be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics; be able to critically analyze relevant theories and concepts, and apply them appropriately. The main thrust of the course, however, is to be able to apply an understanding of our political system to contemporary events. Students will conclude this course with the Advanced Placement Exam in this subject. (5 Credits)

    AP MICROECONOMICS

This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum for Microeconomics developed by the College Board. Students pursuing this course of study must be self-motivated learners interested in pursuing advanced economic study. Students will analyze basic economic systems, supply and demand, models of consumer choice, the behavior of firms, product pricing, government economic policy, factor markets and efficiency. This course is designed to prepare college bound students for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring, and taking the exam is a course requirement. At most institutions of higher learning, a passing grade on the test can be counted as college credit and will exempt the student from introductory economic study. Not to be taken with any other class in the field of economics. (5 Credits)

    AP MACROECONOMICS

This course adheres to the Advanced Placement curriculum for macroeconomics developed by the College Board. Students must be self-motivated learners interested in pursuing advanced economic study building on their foundation of economic knowledge established in Advanced Placement Microeconomics. After a review of basic concepts, students will study topics such as: economic performance measurement, national income and price determination, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, unemployment, stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance. This course is designed to prepare college bound seniors for the Advanced Placement examination administered in the spring, and taking the exam is a course requirement. At most institutions of higher learning, a passing grade on the test can be counted as college credit and will exempt the student from introductory economic study. (5 Credits)

    SOCIOLOGY

This course is for students who are interested in an in-depth study of how people interact in groups. Students will be expected to construct and use the tools of sociologists, such as surveys, behavioral observations and documented research. Required work will include participation in group projects and presentations, analysis of sociological trends in written and discussion formats, and the reading of the class text as well as other supplemental books. Students will study such topics as adolescence, personality development, deviant behavior and social control, the nature of prejudice, and the influence of heredity and environment on human behavior. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in May. (5 Credits)

    PSYCHOLOGY

This course is designed to introduce major schools of psychological theory and practice including personality theory, child development, human motivation, emotions, behaviorism, and abnormal psychology. Included in the program of study will be the contributions of Freud, Skinner, Maslow, Rogers, Jung, Fromm and others. Students will read materials representing humanist, existential, psychoanalytic and other schools of thought. Research projects based on extensive readings will be required. This is an honors course open to interested and capable students and is comparable to a college introductory psychology course. A final examination on all aspects of the course will be administered in May. (5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Early Education & Care

As a member of the Early Education & Care team, students will learn about caring for children, one of the fastest growing professions in America. Upon completion of this program, the Massachusetts Office may certify students as Early Education and Care teachers. The course includes: required class work, learning activities, and field placements at local child care programs. The course is designed so students develop a complete understanding of the physical, intellectual, social and emotional needs of children and their families. Through a wide variety of hands-on activities, students learn the importance of play, how to plan and implement curriculum for children, and develop a portfolio of art and cooking projects. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional equipment and supplies, and work in a classroom area.

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE - CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including basic child development, classroom management techniques, and curriculum models, as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will look more in depth at how children develop from infancy through preschool. They will look to become proficient at understanding the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth of children. The Baby Think It Over dolls are an integral part of this program. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the EEC program will be covered. (5 Credits)

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care - Child Development 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Preschool teacher or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of children, but the focus becomes how to teach preschool students. The class is broken down into three components: class work, learning activities, and field placements at local daycare centers. Course work is designed so students develop a complete understanding of the physical, intellectual, social, and emotional needs of children and their families. Activities will include a variety of hands on activities, lesson planning, cooking activities, and classroom maintenance. Students will be responsible for planning and implementing lessons with their classmates as well as visiting preschool students from a local center. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    EARLY EDUCATION & CARE 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Early Education & Care 2 course. In addition to continuing activities listed above, students will work on developing and organizing files for future use and complete extensive work on their portfolios. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Graphic Communications

As a member of the Graphic Communications team, students will learn design and print skills in a hands-on environment. From digital photography, design, and typography, to the operation and maintenance of offset and digital printing equipment, students will have the opportunity to work in a “real world” shop producing materials for the school system. An emphasis on entrepreneurship is the core of study in these courses, touching on all aspects of the industry. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and tools, and work in a fast-paced production environment.

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications Exploratory course. If you’re interested in communications you will benefit from this course of study. This first in a sequential set of courses exposes students to the world of communications. Pre-press use of Macintosh and Windows computers to create printed and web designs will be explored in a real-world shop serving the school department and some local non-profit community organizations. Successful completion of this sequence of courses can earn the opportunity to receive college credit through existing articulation agreements with local colleges. Among the activities explored will be more in-depth use of the Adobe Creative Suite of software including Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and Acrobat. The basics of digital photography, scanning, and web page creation are also covered. Operation of digital and offset presses and bindery and finishing skills will be used in meeting customer needs. (5 Credits)

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as a Digital Press Operator and teaches the skills necessary to succeed in the world of communications. The responsibilities of performing complex pre-press, print, and finishing tasks will be conducted in a real-world shop serving the school department and local non-profit community organizations. Students will create and print posters, tickets, brochures, and forms, in complex tasks utilizing the Adobe Creative Suite. Folding, binding, and finishing techniques will be more complex and students will benefit from the additional time on task. More in-depth use of digital photography and scanning for print and web page creation will be conducted. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score. (15 Credits)

    GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Graphic Communications 2 course. The final level of study in the Graphic Communications sequence dives deeper into the skills necessary to succeed in the world of communications. Responsibilities increase in all areas and these students will be managing the business and print production. Scheduling, operator oversight, and Quality Assurance will lead to the student acquiring a certificate in Graphic Communications. Students at this level will oversee underclassmen in the creation and printing of posters, tickets, brochures, and forms, in increasingly complex tasks utilizing the Adobe Creative Suite and proprietary software. More in-depth use of digital photography and scanning for print and web page creation will be conducted. Folding, binding, and finishing techniques will be more complex and will require additional time on tasks. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)

    STEM Pathway

    BioMed

Whether discovering new cancer treatments or teaching healthy lifestyle choices to their communities, today’s biomedical science professionals are tackling big challenges to make the world a better place. PLTW Biomedical Science students are taking on these same real-world challenges – and they’re doing it before they even graduate from high school. Working with the same tools used by professionals in hospitals and labs, students engage in compelling, hands-on activities and work together to find solutions to problems. Students take from the courses in-demand knowledge and skills they will use in high school and for the rest of their lives, on any career path they take.PLTW Biomedical Science courses are part of the AP + PLTW biomedical science pathway.

    PRINCIPLES OF BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

This is an introductory biomedical laboratory science course. Students will explore the principles of biomedical science through exciting hands-on projects and problems. Students investigate concepts of biology and medicine as they explore health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. Students will determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional woman as they sequentially piece together evidence found in her medical history and her autopsy report. Students will investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the woman’s life and demonstrate how the development of disease is related to changes in human body systems. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, basic biology, medicine, and research processes and allow students to design experiments to solve problems. Key biological concepts including maintenance of homeostasis in the body, metabolism, inheritance of traits, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. This course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the biomedical sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    HUMAN BODY SYSTEMS

In this laboratory course students examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal Maniken®; use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration; and take on the roles of biomedical professionals to solve real-world medical cases. Requirements: a passing grade in Principles of Biomedical Sciences and recommendation from Principles of Biomedical Science Teacher. (5 Credits)

    MEDICAL INTERVENTION

Will be offered in the Fall of 2021.

    BIOMEDICAL INNOVATION

Will be offered in the Fall of 2022.

    Computer Science

From coding your own game in Scratch, building an app in App Inventor, learning Java, or learning how to prevent against cyber attacks, this Computer Science pathway prepares you with skills needed for the 21st century and future jobs. Throughout the Computer Science pathway, you will be collaborating and problem-solving with your peers to create creative and meaningful projects. Along the way you will be developing computational thinking skills that will be applicable to any future career in tech.

    INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING

This course is designed to introduce students to the breadth of the field of computer science through an exploration of engaging and accessible topics. The course will focus on the conceptual ideas of computing and help students understand why certain tools or languages might be utilized to solve particular problems. Specifically, students will learn about Python and HTML. The goal of Introduction to Programming is to develop in students the computational thinking practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design, limits of computers and societal and ethical issues. (5 Credits)

    AP COMPUTER SCIENCE PRINCIPLES

AP Computer Science Principles provides students the opportunity to use programming, computational thinking and data analytics to create digital artifacts and documents representing design and analysis in areas including the Internet, algorithms, and the impact that these have on science, business, and society. Students use computational tools and techniques including abstraction, modeling, and simulation to collaborate in solving problems that connect computation to their lives. Students complete three creative projects, two collaborative programming projects, and an individual research and writing project on the impact of a recent, computing innovation that appeals to them. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. (5 Credits)

    AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A

This course is the equivalent of an introductory college-level course in computer science. Students will be introduced to different topics in computer science such as design strategies and methodologies, organization of data (data structures), approaches to processing data (algorithms), analysis of potential solutions, and the ethical and social implications of computing. Students who have taken AP Computer Science Principles will build on their knowledge of programming with this course. The Java language will be used to problem solve and work through coding projects. Students will be expected to take the AP exam for this course in May. (5 Credits)

    CYBERSECURITY

Cybersecurity introduces the tools and concepts of cybersecurity and encourages students to create solutions that allow people to share computing resources while protecting privacy. Nationally, computational resources are vulnerable and frequently attacked; in Cybersecurity, students solve problems by understanding and closing these vulnerabilities. This course raises students’ knowledge of and commitment to ethical computing behavior. It also aims to develop students’ skills as consumers, friends, citizens, and employees who can effectively contribute to communities with a dependable cyber-infrastructure that moves and processes information safely. (5 Credits)

    Engineering

From launching space explorations to delivering safe, clean water to communities, engineers find solutions to pressing problems and turn their ideas into reality. PLTW Engineering empowers students to step into the role of an engineer, adopt a problem-solving mindset, and make the leap from dreamers to doers. The program’ s courses engage students in compelling, real-world challenges that help them become better collaborators and thinkers. Students take from the courses in-demand knowledge and skills they will use in high school and for the rest of their lives, on any career path they take. PLTW Engineering courses are part of the AP + PLTW engineering pathway.

    INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING DESIGN

This is an introductory engineering design class. Students will dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science and engineering standards to hands-on-projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. (5 Credits)

    PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING DESIGN

🎥 Click here to learn more about this course offering. 🎥

Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. Students explore a broad range of engineering topics including mechanisms, strength of structure and materials, and automation, and then they apply what they know to take on challenges like designing a self-powered car. Requirements: a passing grade in Introduction to Engineering Design and a recommendation from Introduction to Engineering Design Teacher. This course is a lab science and fulfills a unit of lab-based science for MassCore. (5 Credits)

    CIVIL ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE

Will be offered in the Fall of 2021.

    ENGINEERING DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT

Will be offered in the Fall of 2022.

    CTVE Chapter 74 Automotive Technology

As a member of the Automotive Technology team, students will learn how to diagnosis, repair and maintain automobiles. They will learn about the many systems within a car and apply that knowledge in a practical, hands-on shop setting. In our NATEF accredited automotive shop, students will work on ‘practice’ cars as well as customer’s vehicles. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and tools, and work in a large, well ventilated shop area.

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Automotive Technology Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including vehicle safety inspections, tire service, hand and power tools as well as shop & personal safety standards. Students will begin to learn vehicle and engine configurations, basic engine construction, engine systems, basic electrical/electronics, and diagnostic tools/techniques. Students will have the chance to disassemble, inspect and rebuild an engine. SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention certification will take place and a look at OSHA safety regulations/safety standards within the Auto Tech program will be covered. During the course students will be introduced to working on ‘live’ cars including practice vehicles and actual customer’s cars. (5 Credits)

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Tech 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Automotive Technician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of automotive theory and diagnosis. Additionally students will study all aspects of brake, steering, and suspension systems and begin to interact with customers regarding the repairs to their vehicles Students will take part in SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention course, ASE student certification, Ford ACE certification and Valvoline ignition program certification. (15 Credits)

    AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Auto Tech 2 course. Students will work on all aspects of engine performance including basic operation, mechanical problems, computer controls, electronic fuel injection, forced induction, and emission controls. Students will also learn about heating and air conditioning systems. Students will participate in SP2.org mechanical safety and pollution prevention safety certification. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (17.5 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Electrical

As a member of the Electrical team, students will learn to install electrical equipment to supply equipment for electrical power, lighting, & heating applications in residential, commercial and industrial settings according to both the National and Massachusetts Electrical and building codes. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. Students will have access to professional/commercial equipment and tools, and work in a large, well ventilated shop with simulated residential, commercial and industrial work areas.

    ELECTRICAL 1

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical Exploratory course. Students will review concepts and methods previously taught including basic wiring, switches, and lighting, hand and power tools as well as construction safety standards. Students will begin to learn residential wiring methods, using Romex© and low voltage wiring. They will be taught to read, interpret, follow, and draw electrical drawings and schematics. A more in-depth look at OSHA safety regulations and safety standards within the Electrical program will be covered. At the end of the course students will be introduced to commercial wiring methods. (5 Credits)

    ELECTRICAL 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical 1 course. Students will begin to work on assigned CBVE (Competency Based Vocational Education) projects that are progressively difficult to expand their knowledge to prepare them for a career as an Electrician or related field. They will continue to expand their knowledge of electrical drawings and schematics. Students will take part in a 10-Hour OSHA Construction safety course, earning their OSHA safety certification if they achieve a passing score of 70% or better. (15 Credits)

    ELECTRICAL 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electrical 2 course. Students will begin to work on industrial/commercial wiring methods; theories and motors; motor controls; and relays. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. Hours earned in class or on the jobsite are credited towards the Massachusetts state licensing requirements for Electricians. (15 Credits)

    CTVE Chapter 74 Electronics

The four years of Electronics Technology is designed to prepare high achieving motivated students who plan to start their career after high school or continue their education at a technical or engineering college. The CTE Electronic Technology program integrates Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) into rigorous theory and project based learning. Our goal is to prepare students for a successful college experience and careers in the fields of STEM. As a member of the Electronics team, students will learn and apply fundamental principles of electronic devices and circuits with practical applications through project based learning. All classes emphasize safety and standards required by prospective future employers. The students will learn to work together safely as well as independently, developing their self-confidence. They will learn that “working with your hands” is not easy and requires knowledge and the ability to apply that knowledge. Students will have access to professional equipment and supplies, and work in a classroom area.

    ELECTRONICS 1

As part of the Electronics team students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Investigate basic concepts and applications of analog electronics to include power supplies, amplifiers and oscillators. Prototype analog circuits and use diagnostic instrumentation to troubleshoot. Illustrate and simulate analog circuits using computer software. Fabricate printed circuit boards and printed circuit board assemblies. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Requisites: Safety and Ethics Contract and Dress Code. (5 Credits)

    ELECTRONICS 2

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electronics 1 course. The second in a series of three consecutive outcome-based courses in which students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Investigate basic concepts and applications of digital electronics to include logic gates, counter displays, memory registers, and data selectors. Prototypes digital circuits and use diagnostic instrumentation to troubleshoot. Illustrate and simulate digital circuits using computer software. Fabricate printed circuit boards and printed circuit board assemblies. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Requisites: Safety and Ethics Contract and Dress Code. (15 Credits)

    ELECTRONICS 3

This course builds on the foundation learned during the Electronics 2 course. The third in a series of three consecutive outcome-based courses in which students are exposed to authentic theory and practice within this career field leading to employment or further study. Use the engineering design process to investigate advanced concepts and applications of electronics to include consumer appliances, computers/peripherals, telecommunications, robotics, additive/subtractive manufacturing and drones. Encounter the entire manufacturing cycle by prototyping advanced circuits and systems using microcontrollers and microprocessors. Utilize interactive web-based instruction to supplement and complement training. Perform “live work” on various non-functional, serviceable circuits and systems to return them to industry standard condition. Eligible students may participate in the Cooperative Education Program at an approved worksite. (15 Credits)
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